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It all started with a social media post by Kimmy Neuberger, the best friend of Megen Jay, the mother of Dane Jay, an almost one-year-old boy who is currently in UCLA Medical Center, right across the street from the chapter at the University of California-Los Angeles.

Video from Kimberly Neuberger/Instagram Stories

Neuberger posted a video on her Instagram story and tagged the UCLA chapter. It wasn’t long before Brother Jack Pearce ’24 saw the post online and brought it to the chapter.

Dane was diagnosed with Cardiospondylofacial Syndrome shortly after he was born. Cardiospondylofacial Syndrome is an extremely rare disease. The condition has required Dane to make multiple visits with specialists, time in occupational and physical therapy, and ongoing evaluations for further understanding of this condition and interventions that may need to be done for him.

On February 5, Dane was rushed to the hospital because he was struggling to breathe. After a chest x-ray and an echo were ordered in the emergency room, doctors learned he had pneumonia in his right lung and was experiencing heart failure. He was later transferred to Children’s Health Orange County.

On February 7, after a few days of around-the-clock care, Megen and her husband Chris received more heartbreaking news. Danes echo had shown no progress, meaning the discussion of a heart transplant was in play. Since CHOC is not a transplant hospital, doctors thought it would be best to transfer Dane to UCLA Medical Center and start the heart transplant workup where Dane would undergo more tests.

The next day, he arrived via helicopter. Three hospitals, two ambulances, and one helicopter ride later, Dane is stable and has remained stable as of today.

Since they have been at UCLA, the brothers at the chapter have become like family to the Jays. Brother Ryan Valte ’22 purchased some gifts for Dane and reached out to the family to set up a meeting after Pearce saw the video on Instagram. Tom Churchyard ’22, Aiden Douglas ’22, David Rich ’22, and Pearce all went to go meet with the family.

Photo from UCLA chapter

“The whole house has really rallied around this cause and I honestly couldn’t be more proud of everyone for the way this has been done,” Eminent Archon Nathan King ’23 said.

“I decided to take a video of the Theta Chi house and the SAE house, tagged them both, and put it on social media,” Neuberger said. “I basically said we’ve got a fighter across the street boys, show him some love” Later that night after the SAE boys saw my post they reached out and without hesitation, within an hour and a half they had come up with a special shout out for Dane.”

Photo from Kimberly Neuberger

“We were all in tears after seeing that,” she said. “We had to show the boys some love right back with a special banner just for them.”

On the window of Dane’s room where the brothers can see from the chapter house is a sign that says, ‘SAE boys thanks 4 The Love’.

“I want to first off applaud and pat on the back each and every one of these boys’ parents because I hope my son would do something like this to bless another family,” Megen Jay said in an interview with CBS-Los Angeles.

“The boys have been incredible, reaching out to see if we need anything or to let them know what they can do to help,” Neuberger told us. “They even walked over some special surprises for him and his family last night. Dane loves what they brought him.”

Dane’s story has made its way around the country, getting featured by local CBS and ABC affiliates and an Instagram account known as Good News Movement, an account with over 3 million followers.

From all of us at the Fraternity Service Center, Phi Alpha to the men at UCLA. To Dane and the Jay family, we are here with you. To donate to Dane’s Go Fund Me, click here.

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation is pleased to welcome Daniel Alsaker (Idaho ‘72) to the Board of Trustees. 

Dan is a member from the University of Idaho. He follows in the footsteps of former Trustees Gary Garnand (‘70) and David Poe (‘70), also from the University of Idaho. As an undergraduate, Dan served his chapter as Eminent Archon and Member Educator. Dan has a Bachelor of Science degree in business management. He is the President of Broadway Group, which owns and operates Broadway Flying J Travel Plazas in Washington, Montana, and Nevada. As an alumnus, Dan served as Province Phi Archon. 

Additionally, Dan has served many different organizations throughout his professional career, including school boards, association boards, advisory boards, foundation boards, museum boards, selection committees, fundraising committees, and election committees. Dan and his wife, Anne, live in Spokane, WA. They have four children and four grandchildren. 

Dan credits his success to growing up in a competitive environment which taught him goal setting and commitment and membership in SAE, which instilled problem-solving skills and a philanthropic spirit. 

When asked what motivated him to join the SAE Foundation Board of Trustees, Dan replied that he is thankful for the opportunity to serve the Fraternity in such a beneficial way. He says, “Giving back is the reward we earn for our life’s work.”
His favorite SAE memory is traveling to the Levere Memorial Temple for Leadership School, where he accepted the John O. Moseley Award for Fraternity Zeal on behalf of his chapter in 1970. While there, he said, “I realized for the first time but not the last time that others before us carried our water. We will share in that same task for the well-deserving future generations.”

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Winning isn’t easy, and doing it consistently every season is even harder.

Sustained success is something the Emory Eagles have fortunately been able to create within their Men’s Tennis program. Two brothers from Emory found a way to accomplish the ultimate goal of winning this past spring.

Junior Andrew Esses and Sophomore Will Coupe helped lead the Eagles to their sixth Division 3 National Championship at the Champions Tennis Club in Chattanooga, Tenn., on May 26.

It was the Eagles’ fifth consecutive match victory, closing out the season 10-3.

Photo via emorysae/Instagram

Esses, who was part of the 2019 Championship team, played a more significant role his junior season as the No. 2 doubles team, completing a 6-0 record after he and his doubles partner posted an 8-4 win en route to the Eagles victory.

“It’s an unbelievable feeling. I honestly think the two best moments of my life were both National Championships,” Esses said. “It’s crazy to say, but it makes everything feel like everything you’ve done to get to this point was worth it. I’m confident in my work ethic, and even in high school, after I committed, I still put in a lot of work. It was because I wanted to have a great college career.”

Esses captured the first win in singles matches to help Emory win 5-2 overall over Case Western Reserve to win the title. Esses was named to the UAA All-Association Team to top off a memorable year, being recognized in singles and doubles play.

Photo via andrewesses/instagram

Coupe did not play in the tournament finals but has gained valuable experience as he hopes to be part of the next great Eagles squad.

“Expectations are high, and it’s not easy even if you do everything you can do, it’s not always going to go your way, Coupe said. “I’m going to be an upperclassman next season, and this was the first time I’ve experienced the tournament. It was an awesome experience for me.”

He is Esses’ little brother at the chapter at Emory, which makes sharing the championship that much sweeter.

“Esses and I became very close,” Coupe said. “I’ve always looked up to the guy, and it was one of those things where I wanted to be around and spend a lot of time with him. It was cool to be able to do that at practice and outside of tennis as well.”

“We’ve always been super close ever since he came in,” Esses said. “When he was looking to join a fraternity, I was the one guy in SAE on the team. There were probably six or seven people in other fraternities, and so it was a tough decision for him,” Esses said. “Being able to be on the team with him and share that other bond with him makes us super close.”

Balancing SAE and Tennis

The chapter at Emory has athletes other than Coupe and Esses. The chapter has golf, track and field, cross country, soccer, baseball, and basketball athletes.

“There are people in SAE basically on every sports team,” Coupe said.

“One thing that is so special is the fraternity does a great job in terms of supporting each other because we have a lot of athletes. It means a lot when they post on social media after we won. It does feel good when you know your brothers are rooting for you,” Esses said. It not only makes you want to win a little bit more but also more comfortable.”

“Even though you’re not always seeing them or spending that much time with them as you’d like, they know what you’re doing when you’re not seeing them, and you know what they’re doing. At the end of the day, everyone respects each other’s work ethic,” Coupe said. “It’s cool to support other guys doing different things. One reason I joined SAE was it’s easy to relate to those guys because they’re living similar lifestyles.

Program History Related To SAE

Esses and Coupe join Mark Odgers ’05, Tyson Ramsay ’05, Will Humphreys ’12, Eric Seidelman ’14, and Eric Halpern ’15 as other chapter members at Emory who won a National Championship.

Odgers became the program’s first 8-time All-American during his collegiate career while claiming Rookie and Senior National Player of the Year honors as chosen by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association.

When he graduated, he held the school record for career doubles wins (93) and was third for career doubles win percentage (.762). He ended 10th on the Emory all-time list with 69 career singles wins. He helped the Eagles win their first National Championship in 2003.

Ramsay finished his career in seventh place on the school’s all-time list for career doubles wins (70), seventh in career doubles win percentage (.729), and 16th in career singles wins (58).

Humpherys is No. 15 all-time on the program’s doubles wins (62). He was one of the senior leaders of the 2012 team.

Halpern ended his collegiate career with Emory as the 35th ranked singles player in Division 3 ranks in 2015. With a career singles record of 75-34, his victory total tied for the No. 15 spot on the school’s all-time chart.

University of Miami alumnus Howard Schoen ’54 still has it on the diamond.

At 89, Schoen is still playing the game he grew up loving and playing. He plays in his local softball league in the north suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia.

“Some people say I had a wonderful long life, and I say, ‘I know I have. I’ve been a very busy person, a very active person all my life, and I feel like that’s probably the reason that I have lived as long as I have and being able to play as long as I have,’” Schoen said. “In reality, I pray daily and you thank the lord above and that he’s blessed me to do what I love for so long.”

Schoen began his baseball career at Miami Senior High School in Miami, Florida, where he played infield. His senior season, Schoen, a switch-hitter, hit .303 and made the All-District First Team and All-City second team.

He was coached by Charlie Tate, who coached Schoen in high school football and baseball, the same Tate who eventually coached the Miami Hurricanes football team from 1964-1970, was an assistant for the New Orleans Saints in 1971, and was inducted into the Florida Sports Hall of Fame in 1988.

Under Tate’s coaching, it earned him a baseball scholarship to Miami. He was named the Hurricanes’ captain in 1953. Schoen joined the Sigma Alpha Epsilon chapter at Miami two years prior, in 1951.

“Most of all, my best friends today, one in particular, was an SAE,” Schoen said on why he joined the chapter.

That friend was Holmes Braddock (Miami ’49). They both went to the same high school, ironically, but became close friends in Miami. Schoen and Braddock have remained close friends following his time at the chapter at Miami. Braddock hired him to his first position in the insurance industry after graduation.

Over the years, Schoen has been active with his chapter. He helped develop signs to put out front of the chapter house when first built in the 1960s. He’s also played in the alumni baseball game. He last played in the game eight years ago.

Despite his 5’9, 155-pound stature, Schoen had professional baseball contract offers to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Cleveland Indians. However, he went into the military two months after signing a contract after being drafted, derailing his baseball career.

After returning home from the military, he became a business representative for benefit sales to employers, selling insurance plans for health, disability, and dental. While his military service sidetracked his baseball career, he made the best of his circumstances by playing softball and baseball for the First Army team. He played on several travel teams for 38 years.

While in school, he was a St. Louis Cardinals fan, and his favorite player was Enos Slaughter. He eventually changed alliances to the Braves when he moved to Georgia in 1998.

He was known for his defensive capabilities, which still holds today. He received the Defensive Most Valuable Player on five occasions in World Series Senior Softball Tournaments. He says he would have quit softball years ago but found the Cherokee Senior Softball Association changed that. Today, Howard is in the Senior Softball Hall of Fame.

He and his wife Karen have six children and 14 grandchildren. His grandson Heath is an active brother at the University of South Carolina. He will graduate in 2022.

Photo from Heath Schoen

Howard may not have been able to play in the major leagues, but he’s made the most of his life experiences. At the end of the day, he loves the game and is happy he’s been able to live this long to enjoy it.

Photo from Indiana State Women’s Basketball/Instagram

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Earlier this spring, a Brother from Franklin College of Indiana was named Indiana State’s ninth head coach for the women’s basketball program.

Chad Killinger (’97) has worked his way to the Division 1 level of collegiate head coaching. It was not easy, taking him 25 years to reach this point.

“Basketball was always my favorite sport growing up,” Killinger said. “I can remember in high school sitting in study hall drawing up plays talking basketball with the boy’s basketball coach. I watched the NCAA tournament growing up, and I was more focused on the coaches and what they were doing and the adjustments they were making. It got to a point one time when I wasn’t even rooting for teams but the coach.”

The Journey

Killinger began his coaching career while he was an active SAE at Franklin College. He was a student assistant and volunteer assistant. While working for his Bachelor of Arts degree in Physical Education with an emphasis in Athletic Training, he was a coach for the Bloomington Red AAU Basketball program, one of the top AAU programs around the Midwest.

Photo submitted via Chad Killinger

Killinger was on the school’s baseball team as a freshman, which is how he got involved with the Franklin chapter due to some teammates already being brothers of SAE.

“It’s interesting going through because I was one of those people who thought going to college I never thought I’d join a fraternity, that’s just not me,” Killinger said. “There’s a stereotype of fraternity guys and sorority girls, and I don’t really think that was the case at Franklin, and I’m glad I went into it with enough of an open mind to be a part of it because some of my favorite memories from college in those days, in that house, come from talking about a lot of different things with those guys.”

“The camaraderie that we had at our house at Franklin College was pretty incredible. As a college student, things aren’t always perfect for you, so having people to talk to that maybe have been through the same things, especially as a freshman, was big for me.”

He graduated in 1997. He went on to earn his Master of Sports Science in Sports Management from the United States Sports Academy in 2003.

Killinger is a former national coach of the year at the junior college level. He compiled a 147-71 record at No. 4 ranked Moberly Area Community College, including a 32-1 record in the 2017-2018 season. Killinger was named the U.S. Marine Corps/Women’s Basketball Coaches Association Two-Year College National Coach of the Year, MCCAC Coach of the Year, NJCAA Region 16, and District K Coach of the Year.

He served as an assistant coach at Marshall University. He was the head women’s basketball coach at Lincoln Trail College located in Illinois, where he led the team to a 91-36 record over four years. He also was an assistant for the men’s program.

Before his time at Lincoln Trail, he served as an assistant men’s basketball coach and as the women’s head basketball coach for three years with Jacksonville College in Texas.

The New Guy On Campus

Photo via indstwbb/Instagram

Killinger enters the program during a big transitional time.

Indiana State’s Women’s Basketball program has never earned an NCAA Tournament bid. The last time the program qualified for the Women’s NIT was in 2014. The program has won a total of 10 games in the last two seasons combined.

“Everywhere I’ve gone, we’ve had to build a program,” Killinger said. “I don’t know how long this will take, but I know every day we’re here, we’re going to be working towards getting this team to the NCAA Tournament for the first time, and that being something that’s expected.” 

Being Greek While In College Athletics

Coaching at the JUCO level, his entire career means Killinger has never coached any athletes a part of Greek Life. Now that he’s at a four-year university, he understands it’s something he knows his players will approach him about.

“It’s one of those things I’ve never had to think about until I got to the four-year level,” Killinger said. “Other places I’ve been, the coaches really seemed to be against it.”

Trust is something Killinger will benefit from the doubt to players who show they can balance their schedule.

“If you have someone who can balance their time because both are a big commitment, but both are very beneficial to the development of a young person. When you look at it, yeah, you want to win games. That’s how coaches keep jobs or get jobs, but really the biggest aspect of our job is to help these young women develop into the best people they can be so when they’re done, they can move on and have a career. There are so many doors that can be opened through both avenues. I feel like people like to hire student-athletes because they’re getting a person who can balance their time and be committed to something bigger than themselves, but I also feel like there are many doors that can be opened through Greek Life. I don’t want to close doors on people. I want to help kids have an opportunity to benefit as much as they can from their experience with this.”

Since its start in 2019, March To The Madness has grown from raising $28,000 toward the Annual Loyalty Fund to $83,000 in 2021. This fundraiser, modeled after the NCAA March Madness Basketball Tournament, is not only becoming popular throughout Sigma Alpha Epsilon but has also sparked interest among other Greek organizations.

Why is March to the Madness gaining so much popularity? As SAE Foundation Vice Chairman Tom LaMantia likes to say, “This
is FUNraising.” March to the Madness is a friendly competition among chapters in support of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Foundation. What’s at stake? Aside from your chapter’s name added to the official March to the Madness trophy at the Levere Memorial Temple, the ultimate prize is, you guessed it, bragging rights!

The tournament is set up bracket-style, with chapters competing against each other one-on-one to raise the most money in each
12-hour game. When the buzzer sounds, the chapter with the most money raised advances to the next round.* Sounds pretty
straightforward, right? Yes, until your opponent shoots in the last second of the game and makes a huge donation for the win.

That’s why every chapter needs a strategy and a team captain to organize it. The key to success is a strong leader who can rally
the chapter’s alumni base and, as with any team sport, captains don’t win a March to the Madness championship alone. Not only do
teams need captains, but also dependable co-captains to recruit alumni donors from their classes. All of 2021’s Final Four team captains agreed that chapters should start planning early and recruit co-captains to assist with outreach.

University of Texas-Dallas alumnus James Balandrán says, “A lot of it is just rallying their alumni base and reconnecting with people, and getting a team of people together to rally their own classes and groups. Because one person can’t get their entire chapter to donate, right? It has to be a group effort.”

Likewise, Nathan Crunkilton of Winthrop University says, “I think the one thing I would have done differently was reach out to people earlier in the year. A lot of it was scrambling that last three hours, especially against Indiana.” Additionally, team captains are essential in organizing a strategy and evolving from year to year.

Indiana University alumnus and SAE Foundation CEO Steve Mitchell describes watching future opponents play the game to know
what to expect when his team is against them. Do their donations come in throughout the day or towards the end of the round? Does one donor always contribute, and at what time usually? Does the team wait until the last minute of the match to make a
large contribution? Steve says, “We’ve been in it since the beginning, and you just learn over time how to compete in the event.”

Nathan recalls the feeling of victory after a nail-biting final two minutes of last year’s Elite 8 match-up between Winthrop and
Central Michigan. Neither team had donated with 15 minutes to go in the round. As team captain, Nathan coordinated a strategy
via a Zoom meeting where several members had donations pulled up and ready to go. At the same time, another few
watched the clock or refreshed the webpage to track Central Michigan’s donations.“We ended up beating them by about $400, and I think between the two chapters, we raised about $2,000 in two minutes. It was just a really refreshing and really energizing feeling to be able just to get that two minutes of excitement to know that we beat them on that, and it took us to the Final Four as well, so we were really excited about that.”

Aside from getting wrapped up in the competition, another unintended consequence of this FUNraiser is the connections
made between brothers. Steve describes reconnecting with brothers saying, “You have no idea about the number of people you’ll talk to that you haven’t spoken to in years and just how much fun it’s going to be.”

When asked, “Would you say that it was fun for you to be the team captain?” James said, “For sure. It was a good time to get
everybody back together. We had a lot of participation. Even when we made it to the finals, a lot of our older alums just started
sending out emails.”

Similarly, SAE Foundation Trustee and Oklahoma team captain Jack Counts said, “It’s satisfying when you get a lot of people to
contribute. Honestly. That’s what’s really cool about it. You get a lot of people psyched up. You start getting communications
back. I mean, it’s one thing to be sending out emails to people. When you start to get feedback – Where are we? What’s the
status? You know, things like that. You know you’ve got people interested and involved.”

If you still need some convincing to participate, Steve says, “It’s a ton of fun. I mean, it’s a game, right? You just get so caught up
in it.”

Click here to sign up to be a Team Captain!

*2022’s tournament will feature two wild cards in the Round of 64 and one wild card in the Round of 32. Wild card teams are the losing team(s) with the most dollars raised in that round. The wild card team(s) will replace the winning team(s) that raised less than the wild card, therefore, taking that team’s position in the bracket.

Across the realm, brothers share their passion for Sigma Alpha Epsilon in many different ways. Some are more prominent than others whether it’s by wearing a hoodie on campus or an alum who has an SAE license plate cover. Others might just carry a True Gentleman card in their wallet.

All in all, it shows unapologetic pride for Sigma Alpha Epsilon. In what ways do you show unapologetic pride for SAE? Eminent Supreme Recorder Chris Hancock (Indiana State ’96) and Senior Director of Member Education and Development Spencer Long (Central Michigan ’08) join host Cody Delmendo (Eastern Illinois ’15) to talk about the meaning of unapologetic pride and what it means for brothers across the realm in our final episode of Season 3. 

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Watch Episode 5 of Season 3 on YouTube or listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The recognition of achievement and dedication to Sigma Alpha Epsilon is important. Members and chapters that have distinguished themselves on various levels of the Fraternity or within their professions bring honor not only to themselves but also to Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The Fraternity realizes the value in acknowledging exceptional service and that the presentation of an award of recognition is also a primary way to show our appreciation.

With that said, we are excited to share that Debashis Chowdhury (Minnesota ’98), Neil Sanyal (Carnegie Mellon ’06), and Jeff Wimbish (UCLA ’92) were recognized with the Order of the Lion late last year for their hard work and dedication to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation’s Investment Commission. 

The Order of the Lion recognizes outstanding commitment and loyalty to the Fraternity by an alumnus. The award not only includes a certificate of recognition but a lapel pin as well.

As volunteers, these true gentlemen bring their professional backgrounds to the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation during quarterly meetings to review and recommend changes to investments. Chowdhury is the President of Canterbury Consulting, Sanyal is the Global Head of Research Marketing at Morgan Stanley, and Wimbish is a Managing Partner at Kensington Investment Counsel.

We’re saddened by the news of the passing of Brother Johnny Isakson (Georgia ’66).

Sigma Alpha Epsilon has a rich history of Brothers who have served the United States in an elected office, but few as many times as Isakson. He holds the distinction of being the only person elected to represent the state of Georgia in the state House (1977-1990, seven terms), state Senate (1993-1997, two terms), U.S. House (1999-2005, two terms) and U.S. Senate (2005-2019, three terms).

Isakson was born in Fulton County, Georgia where he began his official political career as a member of the state’s general assembly in 1976.

“Johnny was a proud Republican, but he put country before party, and valued building consensus over political combat. I always loved Johnny’s description of the only division he saw as between ‘friends and future friends. In Johnny’s memory, let us heed the wisdom he offered upon retiring from the Senate, where he urged everyone to devote less energy to describing problems and more effort to working together to provide answers,” President Joe Biden said in his statement.

For his professional success and bringing positive recognition to the Fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon bestowed Isakson, one of the biggest supporters of the Greater Atlanta Alumni Association, with The Highest Effort Award in 2015.

“I consider my fraternity experience one of the most important in my lifetime. It helped shape me in those early years and guides me now,” Isakson told us in 2019. “More than ever, it’s important that undergraduates live the ideals of the fraternity’s founders, rather than give in to momentary pressures. Conscience and courage will take you far.”

Back in November, the men from the chapter at the University of Texas-Dallas hosted its 5th Annual Brad Monks Memorial Golf Tournament, organized through their 501(c)3 charity, Rock The Campus, at the Courses of Watters Creek in Plano, Texas.

The annual golf tournament raised over $20,000. The chapter is donating $15,000 to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and the other $5,000 goes towards Rock The Campus. The organization’s goal goes towards the fight against blood cancer.

In 2005, Brother Carl Lutz ’04 wanted to memorialize his close friend and SAE brother, Brad Monks, who lost his life-long fight with lymphoma. Lutz and fellow members of the chapter set out to raise awareness, fundraise, and celebrate the memory of their friend through a rock concert.

The event’s success led to it becoming an annual on-campus activity at the university. By 2010, it was the inspiration behind its formation, becoming a 501(c)3 non-profit charity.

Today, Rock the Campus actively supports the mission of the North Texas chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. It raises awareness through their philanthropic efforts, working to celebrate Brad’s life and the growing number of others in the chapter’s circle of friends and family who these types of cancer have impacted.

The day included the golf tournament, food, prizes, raffle, and a sports memorabilia silent auction.

The chapter has been doing the event since 2016. The inaugural event had 27 players and 21 sponsors and donated over $4,500 in proceeds to the North Texas Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, which represented nearly 80% of all proceeds from the event going directly to support our charity. It has only grown since then.

With the sad and unfortunate news of the tornados in Western Kentucky this past weekend, the chapters at the University of Louisville, Western Kentucky, and Centre College are taking action.

The Louisville chapter is accepting donations from water, food, and clothing or monetary donations. To learn how you can donate, call or text the chapter’s Eminent Archon Dalton Green at 270-537-3899.

The chapter has a 12-inch trailer they plan to use in collecting donations outside the local Kroger grocery store. With many brothers from Bowling Green, they plan to take most of the donations to the communities surrounding that area. Any monetary donations will go straight to a relief fund or possibly a bunch of $50 VISA gift cards to donate to families.

“The Province is working together and will probably build a year-long fundraiser or service project, because right now there isn’t a lot of hands-on working like cleaning up, especially with all the power lines down,” Green said. “They don’t really need the hands-on help right now, we’d just be in the way. Here in a month or so, we’ll probably have more guys that are making those trips weekly to help clean up and rebuild the cities.”

According to the Louisville Courier-Journal, the Kentucky death toll is up to over 70 people with more than 100 residents still unaccounted for. The governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear confirmed more than 1,000 properties were destroyed.

The Interfraternity Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council, and Panhellenic at Western Kentucky started a Go Fund Me for the community in Bowling Green. Right now they have raised $570. Any donations can be dropped off at the chapter house located at 300 Alumni Ave in Bowling Green.

“I know that our chapter is very interested in helping in whatever way we can,” Centre College Eminent Archon Will Cline said. “I know that Joe Anderson is planning a province-wide event that I’m sure we will be a part of.  I am working with some family members I have from Mayfield, Kentucky to help set up a fundraiser-type thing that KY Kappa can take lead on.”

It’s unfortunate these communities are in this position but we are proud our local chapters are taking the extra step to try and help. Below are more photos of Province Xi helping assist.

The chapter at East Tennessee State has been volunteering with FRIENDS for the better part of the last 15 years, building a reputation as one of the volunteer staples in the community.

FRIENDS is a non-profit organization that promotes the quality of life for people with down syndrome by providing group support. They encourage a community understanding of people affected by down syndrome by raising awareness for those less fortunate.

In recent years, the chapter at East Tennessee State has gone above and beyond to help the organization out with its annual Buddy Walk and many other events. However, this year’s Buddy Walk was not like any normal one due to the pandemic.

“A big thing about it is it’s more than just doing community service. I think the guys enjoy it,” Eminent Archon Erwin Lopez said. “Of course, we get to speak to a bunch of parents and a bunch of people that are with the Buddy Walk. I think the main thing that drives us to do it is just seeing the faces of the kids or the adults that are with FRIENDS.”

Photo from saetnal/Instagram

“This particular year was tough, and they just came through to us,” organizer Allison Mains said. “Buddy Walk last month was tough for several reasons. We got a pandemic going on, this is an outdoors function, but we didn’t know how many people to expect. We figured it would be low, so our morale was low. Half of our board was unavailable, so we were at half staff. They helped set up Friday night, and then a storm came through and blew it all down. When everyone arrived, all the tents were down; stuff was broken. We cannot do this event without them because those tents are heavy and we have a dozen of them. They help set them up, and there’s just no way we could do it,” Mains said.

“Our philanthropy chair, Cole Knight ’22, got a call a few weeks before the event. He dove into it because with COVID and everything going on; it was hard to find people who wanted to volunteer,” Lopez said. “Coming into that day, the morale was low aside from people not showing up, but it was stormy that day. We had to put our big boy pants on and get it done the best way possible.”

The chapter rose to the occasion and was more than helpful at the event. Buddy Walk was established in 1995 by the National Down Syndrome Society. This year, Houston Vandergriff was the Grand Marshal of the event. Houston is a travel photographer based in Knoxville, Tenn. You can see his work and learn more about him here.

Photo from saetnal/Instagram

“They went above and beyond with their assistance. There were lots of moving of tents, chairs, and tables throughout the duration of the day due to weather. They displayed positive and uplifting attitudes to the board members and event participants. As the rain was pouring down, we were holding the legs of the tents down so they would not blow away and as we were watching other tents blow away, every inch of us getting soaked by the rain, I became overwhelmed and began to tear up. One member looked at me and said, ‘You can laugh or cry but I’d rather you laugh,’ and when seeing what I was looking at the tents being destroyed he said, ‘Don’t you worry about that we will take care of that when this is all over,’ and they did. They disposed of the items that were no longer in use. they have taken part of many of our events and have always been wonderful, but this day they went above and beyond and displayed the true meaning of philanthropy.”

FRIENDS PRESIDENT MISTY ADAMS

“We just really had to show out that day,” Lopez said. “I want to shout out Cole Knight, Carson Fitzgerald, Sam Frazier, and Austin Roarke, those guys really picked it up. I think newer guys and younger guys within the chapter seeing how older guys step up really boosted the morale not only for our chapter but for everyone who participated.”

The Division 3 Birmingham-Southern College football program historically hasn’t been something to talk about, but this season, the Panthers broke numerous records en route to their first 10-win season ever.

The program once disbanded in 1939, returned in 2007 after a 68-year hiatus. After the 2020 season was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Panthers had its best season in program history, hosting and playing in an NCAA Championship Playoff game all for the first time.

Brothers Clay Youngblood ’22, Garrett Thrash ’24, Owen Phillips ’23, Luke DeFur ’23, Andrew Smith ’24, and Zion Thomas ’24 were all part of the ride that helped set a new standard for Panthers Football.

Photo submitted by sae_bsc

The historic season came to an end on November 27, losing 42-7 to Mary Hardin-Baylor in the second round of the playoffs.

It was the first season the program hosted and played in a playoff game, meaning it was the first time the team won a postseason contest.

Congratulations to the brothers on a historic season.

Recently the chapter at West Chester University raised $12,866 for the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia during their 16th annual Paddy Murphy week-long philanthropy event.

Photo via saewcu/Instagram

This year the chapter’s goal was to raise $10,000. The events included ‘Pie A Greek With Alpha Phi,’ a bake sale with Alpha Sigma Tau, a 50/50 raffle, and ‘Buy A Guy,’ where campus ladies donated money to the cause for an evening with a brother. They also sold shirts for $25 to help raise funds as well.

The chapter cared deeply about the cause because, specifically, two alums have two siblings who unfortunately frequently need the hospital’s care due to Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD). This rare disease affects approximately one in 40,000 people worldwide who are primarily children. At the moment, there is no cure.

Every year, we aim to raise a certain amount of money and spread awareness for this significant cause to many brothers in the chapter because the hospital’s work has directly or indirectly impacted their families,” Brother Jack Thompson ’23 said.

The chapter’s hard work spread the word quickly, leading to many supporters blowing the goal out thanks to the generosity.

“Every single one of our brothers played a critical role in this amazing fundraiser, and we couldn’t be more thankful. All week we sold bracelets and t-shirts to raise awareness for the Children’s Hospital also to raise money and spread awareness,” Thompson said.

At the end of the week, the chapter invited a bagpiper and elected their traditional Mr. Paddy Murphy, lifted and carried in a coffin in procession to honor all those brothers who have passed.

Photo via saewcu/Instagram

“Paddy Murphy Week is a week where we are truly bigger than ourselves, and we take pride in being able to be a part of such an amazing tradition,” he said. “A special shoutout to our philanthropy chair Eric Citrone ’23 on making this all possible with the help of Eminent Archon Nolan Pecci ’22. Thank you to everyone who donated, and we ask you to continue spreading awareness and recognizing all the great work the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia does for children all around the world.”

The chapter at Michigan State University did its part in raising awareness and funds for breast cancer in its first ‘Pink The Rink’ event last month.

Photo from msu.sae/Instagram

The brothers partnered with Michigan State’s Pi Kappa Alpha chapter in a charity hockey game at Munn Ice Arena, home of Michigan State’s hockey program, that’s won three national championships.

The event was October 23, where the brothers defeated PIKE 9-3, but it was a day where greek unity was imminent on campus.

Spartans basketball player Gabe Brown and football player Elijah Collins also volunteered to host the event.

Altogether the chapter raised $6,746 to benefit the Susan G. Komen Foundation. The foundation addresses breast cancer on multiple fronts, such as research, community health, global outreach, and public policy initiatives to make the most significant impact against breast cancer.

The chapter managed to earn $2,250 in sponsorship money, enough to cover the event’s costs.

“The entire event was a great success, and the representative from Susan G. Komen said it was one of the most organized and professional fundraisers that she had seen for the charity in years,” Philanthropy Chairman Vincent Cipriano said.

“We are fully on board to make this an annual event, and the charity representative is planning on being a bigger part of the planning for next year to make it an even bigger event.”

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to promoting its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 152 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Daniel B. Rather (Georgia Tech ‘57) is the most recent recipient, which was awarded on November 10th, 2021, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Photo from Chris Hancock

As a collegiate, Rather joined Sigma Alpha Epsilon in 1954 while also being enlisted in the US Navy ROTC program at Georgia Tech. In addition to serving his country, he served the chapter as Recruitment Chairman, Eminent Deputy Archon, and Eminent Archon. Following graduation, Rather served two years of active duty in the US Navy before embarking on a real estate career that spanned more than four decades.

Rather worked on various commercial property projects, including several shopping centers in the Atlanta area. In 1985, he was appointed to the Georgia Real Estate Commission, ultimately serving as its Chairman. He served in board positions for the National Board of Realtors, Atlanta Board of Realtors, ONCOR International, and the Beach Company of Charleston.

Rather’s devotion to civic engagement started young. At 14 years old, he attained the rank of Eagle Scout from the Boy Scouts of America—recipients are on average 17 years old. Rather served as Chairman of the Georgia State Board of Technical and Adult Education and the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center Board of Trustees. In addition to supporting numerous charities, he also served in board roles for the Salem College Board of Trustees, the McCallie School Board of Trustees, Morgan County Community Foundation, and the Madison-Morgan Conservancy. 

Rather concurrently served Sigma Alpha Epsilon in several roles, including as President for both the Atlanta Area Alumni Association and the Georgia Phi House Corporation. During this time, he oversaw its chapter house renovation, which was rented out during the 1996 Olympic Games. Rather also helped fundraise over $1 million for the Georgia Phi Foundation and served as its President. His son, Daniel, was initiated into Sigma Alpha Epsilon in 1982 at Sewanee.

Rather is an avid bird hunter, traveling across the United States and worldwide to South America and Europe to shoot quail, duck, dove, grouse, and pheasants. Following his retirement in 1998, he has devoted more time to entertaining family and friends at his beloved Wayside Farm and traveling the world.

Congratulations to Daniel B. Rather, the 152nd recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

On Veterans Day, Sigma Alpha Epsilon honors all those who have served in our nation’s Armed Forces.

We take particular pride in the exemplary service of our fellow Brothers who are military veterans. SAE has a long history of supporting our military, which in fact led to the construction of the Levere Memorial Temple. William C. Levere (Northwestern 1898) was so moved by his experience volunteering overseas in World War I that he envisioned a building dedicated to SAE members who gave their lives in defense of the nation.

Dedicated as a war memorial on December 28, 1930, Levere Memorial Temple honors SAE members who served their country in the armed forces and hosts memorials containing the names of Brothers killed or missing in action. It also features busts lining the balcony, each representing men who served in the three wars (Civil War, World War I, Spanish-American War) between the founding of the Fraternity and the construction of the Temple. Monuments to those lost in more recent conflicts have been added through the years, including World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War.

Inspired by a Department of Veterans Affairs report on the lack of proper health care for veterans, Steve Stein (Northern Illinois ‘09) wrote, produced, and directed a short film, “Lives on the Line.” It highlights some of the struggles military veterans face and hopes to raise awareness and inspire conversations about how we treat veterans. Warning: The film deals with difficult topics such as suicide, which some viewers may find disturbing. It is intended for mature audiences. Viewer discretion is advised.

Stein is an award-winning filmmaker from Chicago with a career rooted in advocacy storytelling. In his mid-twenties, he learned how stories can make a difference by informing people and inspiring change. Stein continues to direct, write, and produce tv commercials and social campaigns.

The fourth episode of season 3 features SAE alumnus and the 33rd Governor of North Dakota, Doug Burgum. Foundation CEO Steve Mitchell interviewed Governor Burgum over Zoom earlier this year. Governor Burgum grew up in a small town of just 400 people in North Dakota. He attended North Dakota State University, where he became a member of the North Dakota Beta chapter. After graduating with a degree in university studies and attending graduate school at Stanford University, Governor Burgum decided to jump into the tech world and started Great Plains Software in 1983. Microsoft acquired Great Plains in 2001. In addition to building this successful start-up and running for office, Governor Burgum was also a senior vice president for Microsoft and started several other businesses – A real estate development firm and a venture capital firm. Tune in today for this episode, which focuses on the lifelong significance of fraternal membership and the importance of values-based leadership. Governor Burgum says that lessons learned as an SAE through leadership opportunities, friendships, and the True Gentlemen are assets and have guided him throughout his professional career.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Watch Episode 3 of Season 4 on YouTube or listen on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

University of Nebraska’s class of 1980 reunites for
laughs and for life

Written by Bill Barna (Nebraska ’84)

Bettering ourselves wasn’t our first thought when we began planning our 40th (plus one) class reunion. Truth be told, it wasn’t a thought at all. Not that we’re against self-improvement, mind you.

After leaving the University of Nebraska, our class to a man put a concerted effort into bettering our careers, lives, and communities (with notable results, I might add). For this event, though, we all focused on one thing, fun.

October 1 and 2 were intended to be a chance to catch up, a chance to laugh, a chance to feed our Nebraska football obsession. The Huskers did their part in impressive fashion, defeating Northwestern 56-7. The reunion’s Friday night reception attended by wives and partners great significant updates on what the years produced in family and occupation.

Laughter was non-stop too, from the first moment we gathered through our group photo at the House on Saturday. The joy was heightened by who and how many brothers made the trip back. A big percentage of our class, 26 of 32, came back to Lincoln from parts near and far.

Big Guy, Little Guy, Boxie, Bergie, Fish, EI, Gimme, TK, TO, Tubey, Junior, Zeke, Marchy, and more. All were back feeling at least for a moment like 40 years was a day. The weekend was all fun and games until it wasn’t. At some point, without a prompt from anyone, we felt a different energy. The emotion was dialed up. As we marveled at how easily our friendships meshed after all these years, we realized, better yet, confirmed just how lucky we were.

Four years forty years ago shaped our lives in ways we thought we fully knew. The rapport and the pleasure of knowing our brothers were truly great guys (True Gentlemen in every sense of the word) moved us all. The guys who hadn’t been to the house in a decade or more teared up in its presence and spoke passionately about its standards being upheld in their absence.
Grown men not normally accustomed to sharing their feelings told other grown men not normally accustomed to sharing their feelings, “I love ya, brother.”

Over the course of our 40th (plus one) reunion, we got the bigger picture of what had happened over the years. Our bond grew not diminished over time, and we were smart enough to realize that’s a rare thing.

Our friendships and the SAE bond shaped us and continue to shape us. The moment that was our reunion went fast, but the moment was not lost on us. SAE was four years in our teens and twenties, but more accurately, SAE was for life. For that, we are eternally grateful.

Photo submitted by Bill Barna

grown men not normally accustomed to sharing their feelings, “I love ya,
brother.”
Over the course of our 40th (plus one) reunion, we got the bigger picture of
what had happened over the years. Our bond grew not diminished over time,
and we were smart enough to realize that’s a rare thing.
Our friendships and the SAE bond shaped us and continue to shape us. The
moment that was our reunion went fast, but the moment was not lost on us.
SAE was four years in our teens and twenties, but more accurately, SAE was
for life. For that, we are eternally grateful.

Can you name an event every chapter does each semester to recruit potential new members?

Almost every chapter will have a fall cookout outside their chapter house, get a pickup game of basketball at the campus recreation center or go bowling at the campus Union. The ideas are endless.

However, has your chapter ever gone to a local high school football game dressed up in costumes and cheered for the traveling team?

If your chapter does this and you’re not from Simpson College, all of us stand corrected at the Fraternity Service Center.

Photo submitted by Caleb McFarland

For close to 30 years, the chapter at Simpson, just south of Des Moines, Iowa, has conducted this unique and traditional recruitment event every fall semester.

To the chapter, it’s known as ‘Small Town.’ The idea was thought up by Brother Tyler Smith ’94.

Photo submitted by Scott Sams
Photo submitted by Scott Sams

This year, the chapter brought potential new members to Southeast Warren High School, home of the Warhawks, to cheer on the Saints from Mormon Trail.

This event has been a tradition within the chapter since the early 1990s. Scott Sams ’94, the chapter advisor at Simpson for the last seven years, says it was just beginning when he joined the chapter.

Sams’ father, John O. Sams ’61 was a brother at the chapter at Drake University. Sams’ two sons, Joesph Sams ’21 and Nathan Sams ’19, both went to Simpson like their dad and experienced this unique event.

“Guys get into it. They do the face paint and paint their shirts,” Sams said. “They were loud, but they were respectful. The fans thought it was cool.”

He said fans would always ask if the chapter planned to come back for the next game. The fans were always disappointed to hear it’s a one-time event every fall.

“It wasn’t always the same matchup each year. We tried to switch it around a bit, especially if some guys in the house were from those towns, and we’d go there and meet some of the guys playing,” he said.

Sams was initiated in 1991 and was already an active member when they first started the tradition.

“Seeing the comradery in terms of all the men doing something together in a positive manner and having a lot of spirit is huge for the event,” Sams said. “It’s seen as a group of guys in a fraternity doing something together, and it’s an event. It’s something they talk about seen as a tradition.”

Photo from Caleb McFarland

Active member Caleb McFarland ’22 was unable to attend the event when he was going through recruitment but says it’s one of his favorite events to participate in annually.

“Small Town has been one of my favorite events because of how we interact with the team and the fans. This year we even got a thank you card signed by the entire team that we cheered for,” McFarland said.

Like every chapter across the Realm, Simpson’s event is just a small example of tradition in its chapter. If your chapter has a tradition that the Realm might be interested in, email us at communications@sae.net.

The men from the chapter at Georgia Tech University recently raised $11,500 to benefit the Jed Foundation through their annual Family Casino Night philanthropy.

Photo submitted by Thompson Rudolph

Similar to our service partner, Movember, the Jed Foundation is a non-profit that strives to protect emotional health and prevent suicide for our nation’s teens and young adults.

Behind the sponsors and a silent auction, the chapter raised the most funds in the annual event. The sponsors of the event were all parents of brothers within the chapter and was during the chapter’s yearly fall semester Parents Weekend.

“It’s considerably a high amount than what we were able to raise for our philanthropy last semester, so we’re pretty happy with the way it turned out,” Eminent Archon Thompson Rudolph said.

The silent auction included a lake house weekend getaway; one family donated a hunting trip, billboard space, a football signed by Georgia Tech’s head football coach Geoff Collins and merchandise signed by professional golfer Harrison English.

“We raised four times as much as our most recent Casino Night,” Rudolph said. “It was big-time for us.”

The chapter in total raised $17,000. The chapter plans to use $5,500 as part of their ‘Capital Campaign’ fund, which is a fund to help kickstart renovations for their house on campus.

The emerging chapter at the University of Michigan is wasting no time in making an impact on campus.

The True Gentlemen, who were reestablished this fall semester, helped raise a record-breaking $73,500 in the 87th Annual MudBowl, a football game outside their chapter house Saturday afternoon. The event was canceled last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic for only the second time in its nine-decade history.

Phi Gamma Delta’s chapter and the chapter at Michigan faced off in a muddy battle right before nationally ranked Michigan hosted Northwestern at Michigan Stadium. Fiji earned bragging rights, defeating SAE 18-6, but everyone won thanks to the service from the Greek Community.

Photo from umich_sae/Instagram

The event supports the Charles Woodson Clinical Research Fund at the University of Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

Of the $73,500, the brothers raised $17,566, more than any fraternity participating.

“The event in years past has only raised around $30,000. It brought the SAE chapter together in general, our new members but also our old members. It was a great event and a signature event the Michigan community missed,” Eminent Archon Gunnar Geiger said.

While the chapter was off-campus, other Greek organizations conducted the event while SAE was off-campus. While it still was a staple in the Michigan community, it never had the “genuine traditional feel” since SAE originally started the event in the 1930s.

“This year, you saw with the amount money we raised, the general feeling with the rest of the community shows how SAE has an integral part of Michigan’s campus,” Geiger said. “Being an emerging chapter and coming back to campus was a motivator for not only our chapter but SAE’s across the Realm.”

Congratulations to the men at Michigan on a successful event.

Make sure to check out more professional photos from the event here. For more information about the Mudbowl, visit michiganmudbowl.org.

If your chapter is doing a service or philanthropy event and you want us to know about it, fill out the form or email us at communications@sae.net.

Photo from umich_sae/Instagram

Adam Musa ’21 grew up in the gas station business. His father and grandfather have been in the industry for over 30 years.

“My family has been in the industry since the early 80s. So when a location, and, more still, an opportunity presented itself in Miami Beach, I went for it. I didn’t let my college studies slow me down.”

Adam Musa from Miami’s Community News

Photo via Miami Community News

The University of Miami brother now owns a car wash, FastPass Car Wash & Gas, a 24/7 service for residents in Miami Beach. His team he compiled remodeled the location, formerly a convenience store with organic food and a juice bar. He credits the help from the brothers of his chapter.

“I learned a lot from them,” Musa said. “It breathes an entrepreneurial spirit. When I used to go to the fraternity house, people talked about business and stuff like that. There is a lot of business talk.”

Musa got the opportunity to lease the location for his first business at just 19 years old.

It all started when Musa joined the fraternity in 2018. Musa was a Double Major in Real Estate & Legal Studies. The culture and environment created within the chapter helped propel Adam to take this chance and opportunity. The chapter at Miami has been one of the top IFC organizations in grade point average over the last decade, and that’s what Musa liked about the chapter.

“Everyone got interested, all my friends and fraternity brothers, and they all chipped in one way or another. We started to think outside the box,” Musa said.

Adam joined his second semester during his freshman year. Before joining, he had no business experience. He says many brothers within his chapter were very business-oriented, and it played an influence on him.

“I have brothers that started a very successful women’s fitness apparel business, a cleaning service in Miami, and many more. The point is there’s an entrepreneurial spirit that the fraternity had that led me into the business,” Musa said. “Once I got into the business, I started as a Car Wash Manager. I got the opportunity to lease the place and rebuild the whole system and found that many customers are SAE alumni. They support the business just on that premise. They take the liking that I’m young, in college and a fraternity, and running a business, so that’s helped me tremendously in terms of customer relations.”

Musa was the engine that helped the chapter raise over $60,000 for the chapter’s week-long Paddy Murphy philanthropy event his sophomore year, with $7,000 coming from the business. It was a 10-day fundraiser at the car wash where all the funds from the memberships sold and $4 car washes went directly to the fundraiser.

His roommate Ben Vinarski ’21 was the Paddy Murphy chairman, and the first year of the event, they raised money for Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. Anywhere from six to nine, brothers from the chapter helped raise funds.

Photo from Miami Community News

Two years after the event, Musa’s business is still intact, and he’s now the owner of two convenience stores called Foodsmart.

“The success we had then gave me a lot of faith and inspiration towards working with other college students past the fundraiser,” Musa told VoyageMIA.

“Since then, I’ve hired and worked with several more students, including a photographer, public relations manager, and media director,” Musa says. “I take pride in my team, as it can be tough for students to get jobs in Miami that pay well and teach important skills at a young age. I think it’s great we can give students these opportunities and help them pay for their educational experience.”

Musa, now a senior at Miami, hopes the event returns next spring. The event was canceled after a year off due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020.

“The University of Miami has allowed me to meet so many knowledgeable and diverse people whose different perspectives help me grow. I hope and envision that I’m able to hire multiple students for full-time work out of college as we start expanding into multiple South Florida locations.”

For brothers in the Miami area, FASTPASS is open 24/7 and is known for its Unlimited Wash Program, where members can pay $24.99/month for UNLIMITED car washes.

The University of West Florida partnered up with Son Of A Saint to raise funds and collect canned goods for Giving Hope: The Food Pantry of New Orleans. 

Son of a Saint, a local non-profit started by former NFL player Bivian Lee, designed to help boys through mentorship, emotional support, development of life skills, and much more all came together to help those in need. Giving Hope is a nonprofit dedicated to changing lives through efforts of their staff, volunteers, and corporate partners, feeding, clothing, housing, and providing fellowship to those in need.

Two members from the chapter, Philanthropy Chairman Jaxon Stanford ’24 Eminent Deputy Archon Jake Bailey ’24, traveled all the way to New Orleans from Pensacola, FL, and helped raise $200 and collect over 200 non-perishable items.

The commute is about three hours from Pensacola to New Orleans. Destruction from a previous natural disaster triggered the chapter to help.

“After seeing the destruction of Pensacola after Hurricane Sally, I knew that I wanted to help the people of New Orleans anyway that we could. It definitely was a great feeling when they found out that we came all the way from Florida just to help out as much as we did,” Stanford said. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s chapter at Nicholls State University had the pleasure of raising money and distributing meals to victims of Hurricane Ida recently.

The chapter’s Feed & Fund Lafourche event served over 2,000 hot plate lunches and distributed $15,000 worth of grocery gift cards to the victims of Hurricane Ida on September 19.

The men served victims hot jambalaya and white beans along with 525 gift cards to the local grocery store.

The chapter was also supported by Nicholls State’s Delta Zeta chapter and various alumni groups to make the event happen.

Photo via sae_nicholls/instagram

“I think what touched me the most about the whole process of helping organize this event was how quickly and readily available our alumni were to help,” Eminent Archon Remy Lodrigues said. “They saw a need to help and the impact this event would have on our community, and they ran with it. I was also heavily impressed at how eager our new members were to help. Both of those statements prove the fact that you are a True Gentleman for life. No matter what path life leads you down after you graduate, you will always have your brothers to lean on in your most vulnerable times.”

You can still donate money to the cause. So far, the fundraiser has 172 donors that have totaled $24,786 with a goal to reach $30,000. One-hundred percent of the proceeds go directly to support some of the hardest-hit victims living in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana.

Photo via sae_nicholls/instagram

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to the promotion of its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards well its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 151 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Thomas L. Hodges (Arkansas-Fayetteville ‘64) is the most recent recipient, which was posthumously presented in Fayetteville, Arkansas on September 18th, 2021 to his wife Carol, two daughters, and two grandsons, both who are members of the chapter at the University of Arkansas.

Hodges’ roots are traced back to Little Rock, Arkansas, where he developed the Otter Creek residential community and the Gateway Town Center; both projects spanned decades. His unfaltering determination drove both projects through spectacular ups and downs, truly showing his commitment to finishing anything he started. His loyalty was also illustrated in his friendships, remaining close with his childhood friend, Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys. Hodges would later serve as President of the Texas Stadium Corporation, which manages the Cowboys’ home field.

Never one to shy away from offering his expertise to others, Hodges served on the Board of Directors of the Pulaski Bank & Trust, the Boys Club of Little Rock, and the City of Little Rock Planning Commission. He was also a member of the Little Rock Chamber of Commerce and the Little Rock Rotary Club. Hodges’ loyalty to Arkansas knew no bounds, where his name remains a staple to this day. It was hard to walk the streets of Little Rock without someone recognizing him.

After a long and very successful career in real estate and commercial development, Hodges’ knowledge in those fields was his way of giving back to the Fraternity. While serving as a chapter advisor for the chapter at Southern Methodist University, he also managed its chapter house renovation in the summer of 1991. After moving back to Arkansas in 1994, Hodges immediately joined the Arkansas Alpha-Upsilon House Corporation. He lent his building expertise, overseeing a facility renovation in 2004 and an 8,000 square foot expansion in 2018.

In 2016, Hodges joined the SAE Financial & Housing Corporation Board of Directors, where he held positions of Treasurer, Vice President, and, at the time of entering Chapter Eternal, President. He oversaw the ownership and management of more than ten chapter facilities across the nation. The Fraternity has previously awarded Hodges with the Order of Minerva and the Merit Key for his dedicated service.

The never-ending dedication Hodges showed throughout life, both professionally and personally, represents the virtue all Fraternity members strive to attain. He truly was a man whose conduct proceeded from goodwill. While Hodges’ presence is missed, his legacy lives on forever with those who knew him and are impacted by his exemplary deeds.

Congratulations to Thomas L. Hodges, the 151st recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

To view more photos from the event click here.

The brothers of the chapter at the University of Louisville recently volunteered to help the Louisville chapter of Blessings in a Backpack at their fourth annual golf scramble.

Blessings in a Backpack mobilizes communities, individuals, and resources to provide food on the weekends for elementary school children across America who might otherwise go hungry.

Brother Brett Holsclaw is the son of the non-profit’s Managing Director Kim Holsclaw, which lead to the chapter’s involvement for the first time this fall. The chapter plans to serve for years to come.

“Kentucky Sigma is a brotherhood that prides itself on not only having fun but also getting out in the community and making a difference through service,” Eminent Archon Mason Howard said.

The non-profit started with just two schools in 2005 and now serves 88,900 students in 1,092 schools spread throughout 46 states and the District of Columbia.

Photo provided by Dalton Green

 

The third episode of season 3 features retired Air Force General Richard B. Myers, SAE alumnus and President of Kansas State University. Foundation CEO Steve Mitchell interviewed President Myers over Zoom earlier this year. President Myers grew up just outside of Kansas City, Kansas, and studied mechanical engineering at Kansas State University. He is a member of the Kansas Beta chapter and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force shortly after graduating. Throughout his 40 year military career, President Myers had many assignments, most notably Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President Bill Clinton and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff under President George W. Bush. As someone who had no interest in joining the armed forces when he started college and then worked his way up to be the highest-ranking member in the U.S. military, President Myers has an interesting perspective on what it takes to succeed.

Tune in today for this episode, which focuses on the importance of excelling in your current role, whether that be student, professional, volunteer, or otherwise, to be successful in the future. President Myers says, “We can tell you what it’s going to take to be successful tomorrow, and that’s to be the best at what you’re doing today.” Additionally, President Myers discusses following the guidance of the True Gentlemen, self-reflection, working to improve each day, and taking responsibility for mistakes you’ve made.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Watch Episode 3 of Season 3 on YouTube or listen on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

Over the weekend, the emerging chapter at Clemson University took the extra step in remembering the victims from September 11, 2001.

Photo via clemsonsae/Instagram

The brothers represented Sigma Alpha Epsilon on the campus steps of Sikes Hall in remembrance of those who passed.

Each brother climbed 110 flights of stairs in honor of the fallen first responders who climbed 110 flights of stairs that tragic day.

In total, the brothers climbed more than 7,000 flights of stairs as part of a fundraiser for the local fire department. 

“It was an honor to have the opportunity to show our appreciation for Clemson Fire and Emergency Medical Services, as well as for all our first responders across the Realm,” organizer Donivan Okolita said. “We enjoyed showing our respect for the heroes of 9/11, for respecting the sacrifice that they made and continue to make. We hope to make this an annual event and we look forward to working more with these departments in the Clemson community.”

On that tragic day, thousands of first responders rushed blindly to the service of those in need. Of the 2,977 victims lost, 343 were members of the New York City Fire Department. In total, 412 victims were first responders.

We will never forget September 11th. It is a day to reflect, remember, and a day to come together. The brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon will continue our support of 9/11 victims, first responders, and never forget the seven brothers who perished.

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness month. We are sharing educational information and the resources Sigma Alpha Epsilon provides to help promote mental health and suicide awareness.

SAE is committed to the health and well-being of our members. Together we can work to normalize the need for help. Suicide and mental health are realities that impact our brothers. 

1 in 5 adults in the U.S. lives with a mental health condition. Nationwide, 9.2 million college students are experiencing a diagnosable mental health concern. Depression affects 20-25 percent of Americans ages 18 or older in a given year. There is one death by suicide in the U.S. every 11 minutes. Suicide among males is four times higher than among females. Male deaths represent 79% of all U.S. suicides. 

The term “suicide” comes from the root “-cide”, which means to kill. This root is commonly connected to the wrongful and criminal acts of genocide, homicide, etc. This problematic terminology describes suicide as a mode of killing rather than a mode of dying.

The term committed is also important to understand in changing the narrative around suicide. Although suicide was never a crime in ancient Rome, there was opposition reflected in cultural practices and this term echos “committing a crime.” Rather, using the term completer or the phrase died by suicide takes some of the negative stigmas away from the person. 

The leading factors that contribute to suicide include feeling alone, like a burden, and hopeless. The combination or overlap of these three factors is where suicide is the highest risk. 

SAE currently offers the QPR Online Gatekeeper Training free of charge to all collegiate members. This self-paced module aims to equip participants with the skills to recognize signs of crisis, respond to someone in crisis, and get help and save a life. We have also developed a chapter discussion guide for brothers to get together and discuss what they learned in the online module and to apply it to their chapter and campus.

SAE’s service and philanthropic partner, Movember, also offers many excellent educational resources, which brothers and chapters may use as a supplement to additional suicide prevention training.

Most college campuses have a counseling center or mental health services that offer free resources to students. SAE encourages all chapters to utilize these free resources, both for individual counseling services and for chapter-wide education.

To speak with someone immediately, contact National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK), contact Lifeline Crisis Chat or contact National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) at 800-950-6264, or Text NAMI to 741741. If you’re ever worried that someone’s life is in immediate danger, call 911 or go directly to emergency services.

Information courtesy of Movember, What Good Looks Like, Active Minds, and Suicide Awareness Voices of Education.

Our condolences go out to the brothers at the chapter at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as they recently lost Brother Nick Humphrey (’21).

Photo via sae_wisconsin/instagram

The Illinois native entered Chapter Eternal due to complications linked to sudden cardiopulmonary failure. He was only 22.

On June 23, 2021, Humphrey passed after recently graduating from Wisconsin’s School of Agriculture, majoring in Agronomy.

“Nick was a passionate student, and his character was exemplary of the SAE Wisconsin community,” former Brother Zachary Houston-Read said. “It has been heartbreaking for all of us, and we have all worked on many ways to honor his memory.”

The brothers at the chapter and the Wisconsin Foundation have teamed up to start a memorial scholarship to honor him.

The Nick Humphrey Memorial Scholarship will be awarded to students within the McBurney Center, which helps kids with learning disabilities. Nick was proud to be a McBurney student.

The chapter’s goal is to raise $25,000 towards this fund. This amount is the university’s threshold for creating a permanent fund that will be reinvested and awarded annually. Anything below $25,000 will allow the scholarship to function only until the initial fund is depleted.

Photo via sae_wisconsin/instagram

They have until October 1 to raise $25,000. They currently have just over $10,000 raised right now.

“Everybody was close to Nick because he made an effort with everyone. He made everyone feel special. He was a really special guy too,” Wisconsin’s Eminent Archon George Lampen said. “Nick was the first person many of us met upon arriving in Madison: a comforting, intelligent, and quirky presence that made everyone around him feel special.”

“Nick was friends with everyone because he made an effort to know and relate to all of his brothers. We all feel this loss, and we are all blessed to have had a brother and friend like Nick.”

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of the Onyx Level to the Founder’s Circle. The Founder’s Circle is a cumulative giving society acknowledging donors who have made a significant contribution to the SAE Foundation throughout their lives. The Onyx Level, recognizing donors who have contributed between $75,000-99,999, falls between the Amethyst Level ($50,000-74,999) and the Ruby Level ($100,000-249,999). 

The addition of this new level allows the SAE Foundation to appropriately honor loyal donors who continue to go above and beyond in support of the Fraternity’s educational programs, leadership opportunities, and scholarship offerings. 

“Our goal was to provide another level of recognition and achievement between $50k and $100k, and feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. Donors are really excited about this. They can advance farther without having to potentially double their current gifts,” Steve Mitchell, President & CEO of the SAE Foundation, said.

See below for a list of the current Onyx Level donors, and click here for more information about the SAE Foundation. 

  • John F. Barrett (Cincinnati ’71)
  • James L. Bennett (Drake ’42)
  • M. Todd Buchanan (Southern Mississippi ’90)
  • George E. Chandler (Willamette ’61)
  • William C. Chapman (Oklahoma ’57)
  • David J. Colten (Rensselaer ’72)
  • Pat M. Courington, Jr (Birmingham-Southern ’63)
  • Dennis John Devaney (Colorado State ’94)
  • August B. Doppes (Cincinnati ’70)
  • James G. Ellis (New Mexico ’68)
  • Frank Clark Ginocchio (Northwestern ’66)
  • Thomas Gordon Goodale (Iowa State ’62)
  • Walter L. Gross, III (Miami [OH] ’75)
  • Mark A. Haring (Indiana State ’72)
  • Thomas Z. Hayward, Jr. (Northwestern ’62)
  • Frederick J. Kleisner (Michigan State ’66)
  • Gary C. Martin (Auburn ’57)
  • Steven D Mitchell (Indiana ’83)
  • Thomas Brant Nusz (Mississippi State ’82)
  • Mason Walsh, Jr. (Penn State-State College ’57)

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to the promotion of its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards well its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 150 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Howard H. Wood (Cal State-Los Angeles ‘66) is one of the most recent recipients, which was presented to him during the 165th Anniversary Convention of Sigma Alpha Epsilon in Des Moines, Iowa on July 17, 2021.

As a founding member of the chapter at Cal State-Los Angeles, Wood ensured that future generations of men would have the same opportunity you did at the everlasting fraternal experience, which helped develop your leadership skills. After graduating, he started a financial firm, which is still in operation to this day.

Wood never strayed far from the Fraternity, serving as the first chapter advisor for Cal State-Los Angeles, a post he holds to this day. In 1992, he was elected as President of the Pasadena Alumni Association, another post he still holds to this day. He also currently serves as the California Mu House Corporation President.

For twelve years between 2002 and 2014, Wood served as Province Chi Archon, leading and guiding multiple generations of men, including sons of his classmates. He developed the Province Chi Day of Service, helped foster a relationship with Autism Speaks Los Angeles, and continues to serve Province Chi as its Recorder.

“There are many other people with better portfolios than I have,” Wood said. “I never thought that anything I was doing with the fraternity would ever lead me to this because frankly, most of my work has been at more of a local level. My interface with guys for the last 40 years, has always been a delight, such a pleasure.”

“I’m deeply humbled. I was speechless when I got my Merit Key and speechless this time. For a guy my age to get this, it was certainly a great acknowledgment. To have my son there was great. It was very cool.”

Congratulations to Howard H. Wood, the 150th recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

Across the realm, many chapters will be transitioning back to campus life we knew before the COVID-19 pandemic this fall. In this episode, Cody Delmendo (Eastern Illinois ’15), his new co-host Gage Wolt (North Dakota State ’18), and this month’s guest Seth Crawford (University of Houston ’18) discuss the three discussion points to help undergraduates transition back to returning to campus for the next school year. The three goals highlight making the most of being an active member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, chapter standards academically, socially, and utilizing new recruitment methods, and reviving chapter traditions.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Watch Episode 2 of Season 3 on YouTube or listen on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to the promotion of its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards well its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 149 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Gary L. Garnand (Idaho ‘70) is one of the most recent recipients, which was presented to him during the 165th Anniversary Convention of Sigma Alpha Epsilon in Des Moines, Iowa on July 17, 2021.

As an undergraduate, Garnand served as Eminent Correspondent, Eminent Recorder, and Eminent Deputy Archon. He also represented the chapter at the 113th Anniversary Convention in 1969 and spearheaded its 50th anniversary. After graduation, he continued serving as Province Phi Archon, leading and guiding collegiate members in Idaho, Montana, and Washington.

Early in your post-graduate life, Garnand made a concerted effort to keep everyone connected. What started as a simple mailed newsletter of life happenings has morphed into a master contact sheet, turning him into the rallying point of every living alumni of your chapter. For decades, Garnand has been the information catalyst for Idaho Alpha.

For four years, Garnand chaired the Alumni Services Committee, then co-chaired the Vietnam Memorial for Levere Memorial Temple. He also served on the SAE Foundation Board of Trustees for four years and on the SAE Financial & Housing Board of Directors as its Secretary and eventually Vice President. The University of Idaho chapter has named him Advisor of the Year three times and until recently, he was President of Idaho Alpha’s House Corporation and currently serves as President of the Magic Valley Alumni Association.

Professionally, Garnand started a fresh produce brokerage business with his father in 1971, which is still in business today. Garnand is involved in a number of chambers of commerce, rotary clubs, investment boards, and real estate development boards. Rotary named him a Paul Harris Fellow an astounding four times and he has also received multiple awards from the University of Idaho, including the College of Business’s Service Award and Distinguished Service from its Athletic Department.

“I didn’t ever think I would have that honor. I’ve been grateful for many things SAE has provided me, but this one was completely off the books,” Garnand said. “At the time, I couldn’t realize and grasp the magnitude of that honor and I’m not sure if I ever will.”

“I guess over the years I’ve always thought it would be great to win, but never expected it to happen. Having Greg Brandt there made it so special. Greg has been an amazing Eminent Supreme Archon. To have him be the ESA and sign that plaque made it very special to me. It makes it more special, and to realize all the SAE’s I’ve known all my life, out of all the amazing SAEs and I’m 149th DSA, it’s an amazing honor.”

Congratulations to Gary L. Garnand, the 149th recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to the promotion of its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 148 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Steven W. Churchill (Iowa State ‘85) is one of the most recent recipients, which was presented to him during the 165th Anniversary Convention of Sigma Alpha Epsilon in Des Moines, Iowa on July 17, 2021.

Churchill joined the chapter at Iowa State in 1982 and led the chapter as its Eminent Archon. After graduating, he helped establish both the Iowa Gamma and Central Iowa Alumni Associations and is also a past President of both. Churchill served on the Iowa Gamma House Corporation board for over two decades and led the efforts to raise nearly $2 million for the chapter. He also helped resurrect the Chicago Area Alumni Association and served on its 157th Anniversary Convention Host Committee.

For ten years, Churchill guided the Fraternity as a member of the Supreme Council. He was not afraid to take risks and helped steward the elimination of pledging—which today is becoming the norm for fraternities. His expertise was also lent to the committees on Finance & Audit, Fraternity Law, Government Relations, Leadership School, Strategic Planning, Technology, and Undergraduate Advisory. 

In his professional career, Churchill most notably served three terms on the Iowa House of Representatives and also held leadership or executive positions for the American Medical Association Foundation, the Association of Healthcare Philanthropy, Des Moines University, the Iowa Civil War Monument Foundation, Iowa State University, North Park University, the Rotary Club of Des Moines, and Simpson College. Most recently, he was Chief of Staff at the United States Embassy in Beijing, China.

Churchill was named to the Des Moines Business Record 40 under 40. He was also named Fraternity Advisory of the Year at Iowa State and is the inaugural inductee of its Greek Hall of Fame. The United States Department of the Army has bequeathed him with The Commander’s Award for Public Service, now known as the Public Service Commendation Medal. 

“I was honored that the Supreme Council would recognize me with the award. It really was a nice capstone with my involvement,” Churchill said. “The leadership aspect of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s mission has impacted my life profoundly. So much of what I learned goes back to when I was a student at Iowa State.”

“I felt grateful for the opportunity to serve. I thought back to when I was back at Iowa State as the EA and how that’s impacted me. The fundamental principles of leadership whether you are your chapter’s president or the Chief of Staff at the United States Embassy in Beijing are the same.”

Congratulations to Steven W. Churchill, the 148th recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

Recognition of achievement and dedication to the Fraternity is important. Members and chapters that have distinguished themselves on various levels of the Fraternity or within their professions bring honor not only to themselves but also to Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The Fraternity realizes the value in acknowledging exceptional service and that the presentation of an award of recognition is also a primary way to show our appreciation.

The John O. Moseley Zeal Award recognizes the chapter that best exemplifies a model chapter in Sigma Alpha Epsilon. This chapter excels in its operations and brotherhood, fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers and its members and by living the life of a true gentleman. This chapter goes above and beyond expectations and demonstrates true zeal and excitement for the Fraternity, exhibiting a strong bond of brotherhood. The winning chapter receives a $5,000 donation to its Chapter Education Fund, endowed by Warren P. Poslusny (Kettering ’69) to recognize brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service in the Fraternity.

The University of Evansville was honored with the 2021 John O. Moseley Zeal Award at the 165th Anniversary Convention in Des Moines, Iowa on July 17.

In 2020-21, a year unlike any other that was very tough on all chapters across the Realm, the chapter at the University of Evansville only had two active COVID-19 cases over a span of nine months.

Due to the pandemic, the chapter went above and beyond to revolutionize many positions and events throughout the school year. For example, the Paddy Murphy Chair changed the way the events were implemented by holding its first-ever Paddy Murphy Madness, a Hoop-A-Thon event, where brothers would shoot free throws and three-pointers to raise money for their local philanthropy, Chemo Buddies. With this new event, they were able to raise over $5,000, which was the most they ever raised for Chemo Buddies.

Photo via Chemo Buddies/Facebook

The chapter became the first and only Greek organization on Evansville’s campus to implement a Diversity Chairman. With this position, the chapter was able to learn and grow as True Gentlemen by learning about different cultures, perspectives, and the importance of accepting different individuals. The addition keeps open contact with the University’s Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.

“It was a humbling experience. Being a part of SAE is more than just 4 years,” EA John Helmerich said. “To be a part of that and get the recognition, that was one of the biggest things for me. It kind of put everything in perspective.

We love telling our guys it’s great to win these types of awards, but getting complacent is so important. I think complacency is the biggest way we’d slow down. Trying to one-up ourselves every day is a great way to keep that from happening.”

On top of these achievements, they won Evansville’s Chapter of the Year award, beating out 11 other fraternities and sororities, to top off a strong school year.

Congratulations to the SAE chapter at the University of Evansville.

Recognition of achievement and dedication to the Fraternity is important. Members and chapters that have distinguished themselves on various levels of the Fraternity or within their professions bring honor not only to themselves but also to Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The Fraternity realizes the value of acknowledging exceptional service and that the presentation of an award of recognition is also a primary way to show our appreciation. 

Awards, accolades, and recognition are all ways in which we celebrate the achievement of our members and chapters. The annual Fraternity Awards competition recognizes individuals, chapters, house corporations, and alumni associations for their outstanding efforts to advance the mission of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The 2021 Awards recipients are listed below. Congratulations to all for personifying the values and traits of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

ADVISORY BOARDS

Stuart Zoock Outstanding Advisory Board

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon) — WINNER

Oregon State University (Oregon Alpha) — RUNNER UP

ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS

Bill Fiscus Outstanding Area Alumni Association

SAE Phoenix Alumni, Inc. — WINNER

Greater Atlanta, GA Alumni Association — RUNNER UP

Most Improved

New Orleans, LA Alumni Association — WINNER

Outstanding AA Communication in Electronic Newsletter

SAE Phoenix Alumni, Inc. — WINNER

Greater Atlanta, GA Alumni Association — RUNNER UP

Outstanding AA Communication in Print Newsletter

Oregon Alpha Alumni Association — WINNER

SAE Phoenix Alumni, Inc. — RUNNER UP

Outstanding AA Communication Website

Greater Atlanta, GA Alumni Association — WINNER

Outstanding AA Special Events or Project

Greater Atlanta, GA Alumni Association — WINNER

SAE Phoenix Alumni, Inc. — RUNNER UP

Outstanding Chapter AA

Oregon Alpha Alumni Association — WINNER

Ohio Alpha Alumni Association — RUNNER UP

HOUSE CORPORATIONS

Outstanding House Corporation

South Dakota State House Corporation (South Dakota Theta) — WINNER

Mississippi State House Corporation (Mississippi Theta) — RUNNER UP

Outstanding HC Communication in Print Newsletter

Mississippi State House Corporation (Mississippi Theta) — WINNER

South Dakota State House Corporation (South Dakota Theta) — RUNNER

Outstanding HC Communication in Electronic Newsletter

South Dakota State House Corporation (South Dakota Theta) — WINNER

Mississippi State House Corporation (Mississippi Theta) — RUNNER UP

Outstanding HC Website

Mississippi State House Corporation (Mississippi Theta) — WINNER

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

Besser-Lindsey Scholar-Athlete Award

William Kamps, University of Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Theta)

Todd Buchanan Recruitment Chairman Award

Justin Tinkler, Kansas State University (Kansas Beta)

Outstanding Chapter Advisors

Becky Bair, Advisor to University of Toledo (Ohio Nu)

Wendell Bouwman, Advisor to South Dakota State University (South Dakota Theta)

John Brkic, Advisor to Youngstown State University (Ohio Alpha)

Donovan Golich, Advisor to Michigan State University (Michigan Gamma)

Kevin Johnson, Advisor to University of Cincinnati (Ohio Epsilon)

Scott Lauber, Advisor to Bowling Green State University (Ohio Kappa)

Aldrian Smith, Advisor to Nicholls State University (Louisiana Chi)

Mike Weiglein, Advisor to University of Northern Iowa (Iowa Chi)

Outstanding Eminent Archons

David Cu, California State University-Northridge (California Nu)

Jack Curran, University of Colorado-Boulder (Colorado Chi)

Blake Frichette, University of Oregon (Oregon Beta)

Alex (Eric) Fusselman, California State University-Fresno (California Iota)

Daniel Goggans, Franklin College of Indiana (Indiana Alpha)

Hunter Hensley, East Tennessee State University (Tennessee Alpha)

Nick Koupiaris, Youngstown State University (Ohio Alpha)

Michael-Daniel Oded, Florida State University (Florida Beta)

Evan Sterling, Arizona State University (Arizona Beta)

Bradley M. Cohen Eminent Archon of the Year Award

Alex (Eric) Fusselman, California State University-Fresno (California Iota)

Outstanding Eminent Treasurers

Justin Clary, Franklin College of Indiana (Indiana Alpha)

Spencer Davis, University of Colorado-Boulder (Colorado Chi)

Cameron Feldman, Florida State University (Florida Beta)

Hunter Fenton, Kennesaw State University (Georgia Omega)

Alex Lorenzin, University of Colorado-Colorado Springs (Colorado Phi)

Tyler McGoldrick, University of Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Theta)

Bradley McHugh, Michigan State University (Michigan Gamma)

Joseph McKinney, Central Michigan University (Michigan Delta-Omega)

Chad Oswald, University of Toledo (Ohio Nu)

Blake Steele, Kansas State University (Kansas Beta)

Andrew Wilson, Albright College (Pennsylvania Sigma-Mu)

Kenneth D. Tracey Outstanding Interfraternal Leadership Award

Jack Kneisley, DePauw University (Indiana Delta)

True Gentleman of the Year

Hector Lozada, Florida State University (Florida Beta)

CHAPTER AWARDS

John O. Moseley Award of Fraternity Zeal 

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Chapter Achievement Awards

Auburn University (Alabama Alpha-Mu)

University of Alabama (Alabama Mu)

Arizona State University (Arizona Beta)

University of Colorado-Boulder (Colorado Chi)

Colorado School of Mines (Colorado Lambda)

Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Phi)

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Drake University (Iowa Delta)

Kansas State University (Kansas Beta)

Morehead State University (Kentucky Gamma)

Centre College (Kentucky Kappa)

Nicholls State University (Louisiana Chi)

Youngstown State University (Ohio Alpha)

University of Toledo (Ohio Nu)

Oklahoma State University (Oklahoma Mu)

South Dakota State University (South Dakota Theta)

Texas State University (Texas Sigma)

Baylor University (Texas Theta)

University of Puget Sound (Washington Gamma)

Most Improved Chapter Award

Florida State University (Florida Beta)

Harry S. Bunting Outstanding Colony of the Year

Clemson University (South Carolina Nu)

Outstanding Alumni Relations

Kansas State University (Kansas Beta)

Brandon Weghorst Outstanding Chapter Communication

University of Colorado-Boulder (Colorado Chi)

Outstanding Chapter Member Education

Baylor University (Texas Theta)

Outstanding Financial Management

Colorado State University (Colorado Delta)

Outstanding Health-and-Safety

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Outstanding Chapter Housing

Kansas State University (Kansas Beta)

Joseph A. Mancini Outstanding Chapter Service and Philanthropy Award

University of Alabama (Alabama Mu)

Kimball-Phelps Award for Outstanding Chapter Singing

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Noble Leslie DeVotie Outstanding Ritual Award

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Robert C. Cousins Award for Outstanding Recruitment

Kansas State University (Kansas Beta)

Outstanding Chapter Scholarship

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Smith-Huffman Outstanding Chapter Management

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Outstanding University Relations Award

University of Evansville (Indiana Epsilon)

Recognition of achievement and dedication to the Fraternity is important. Members and chapters that have distinguished themselves on various levels of the Fraternity, or within their professions, bring honor not only to themselves but also to Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The Fraternity realizes the value in acknowledging exceptional service and that the presentation of an award of recognition is also a primary way to show our appreciation.

The True Gentleman of the Year Award is the highest honor the Fraternity can bestow on an undergraduate brother. The award, first given in 2000, is presented annually to an undergraduate who has been determined to be the most outstanding collegiate in Sigma Alpha Epsilon, considering scholastic achievement, fraternity involvement, university leadership, and community service. Each chapter in good standing is encouraged to nominate a brother deserving of this honor. The winner will receive a $5,000 scholarship award, endowed by Warren P. Poslusny (Kettering ’69) to recognize brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service in the Fraternity.

Hector Lozada (Florida State University ’21) was named the 2021 True Gentleman of the Year. Lozada has served as his chapter’s Eminent Correspondent, Philanthropy Chairman, Executive/Presidential Advisor, and as a member of the National Committee for Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity.

Photo via hectormlozada/Instagram

On-campus, Lozada served as an Interfraternity Council Rush Captain, Hazing Prevention Coordinator, a member of the Center For Health Advocacy and Wellness, Chairman of the IFC Expansion Committee, Vice President of Membership, an assistant for the Fraternity and Sorority Life Emerging Leaders Course, and was a member of the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life Hiring Committee.

In his community, he completed over 300 community service hours in the past year alone. Academically, he was named to the Florida State President’s and Dean’s list four times, maintaining a 3.6 GPA. Lozada’s leadership within his chapter led them to the Most Improved Chapter at the 165th Anniversary Convention as well.

“Obviously I was proud of myself, but really I was proud for representing my chapter in that way,” Lozada said. “We’ve been through a ton in these past couple of years since I joined the chapter. Just to see us come this far, I was proud of myself but I was really happy I could represent my chapter and Florida State in that light as well. 

We were in thousands of dollars in debt, an almost insurmountable amount of debt. We’re all on good footing now and I think we’ve provided that foundation and it was really hard to get there.”

Lozada is planning to attend law school at the University of San Diego this fall. He hopes to become a lawyer, specializing in intellectual property.

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to the promotion of its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 146 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Loren J. Boone (South Dakota State ‘72) is one of the most recent recipients, presented to him during the 165th Anniversary Convention of Sigma Alpha Epsilon in Des Moines, Iowa on July 17, 2021.

Boone was a charter initiate of South Dakota Theta in 1971. As an undergraduate, he wrote the chapter newsletter, which continues to be published today. Upon graduation, Boone served as a chapter advisor from 1973 through 1989. He created the chapter’s Dollar-a-Year Club in 1975, chartered the South Dakota Theta Alumni Association in 1982, and served two terms as South Dakota Theta’s House Corporation Director.

In 15 years on the Province Tau Council, Boone guided chapters in Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota, serving 10 of those years as Province Archon. He also served on the faculty of eight Moseley Leadership Schools and as chairman of SAE’s Member Education Committee for several years.

“It’s very humbling and overwhelming,” Boone said. “I have been involved but there are so many who do so much, so, I’m incredibly humbled to receive this award. It was a big surprise.

It’s an incredible thing. The whole experience was a blur. To be recognized with all the other DSA winners is remarkable.”

Boone and Deanna, his wife of 47 years, have provided SAE with extensive financial support that has generated more than $1.4 million. These dollars fund four scholarships, registration to national leadership events, student travel, alumni programs, and fraternity housing. Boone also served as co-chairman of a campaign that opened a new SAE chapter house at South Dakota State in August of 2013.

During his public relations career, Boone served on South Dakota’s American Legion Boys State staff, advised fraternities at Ripon College and St. Cloud State University, and now serves as a trustee for the South Dakota State University Foundation.

There are not many who claim life-long service to the Fraternity. Boone has been in continuous leadership roles for more than 50 years, ensuring future True Gentlemen have opportunities to excel.

Congratulations to Loren J. Boone, the 146th recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

The first episode of Season 3 features Vincent Marsala, SAE alumnus and Superintendent for Turner Construction Company. Most recently, he oversaw the construction of LA’s brand new So-Fi Stadium. So-Fi Stadium is home to the LA Chargers and LA Rams and will host Super Bowl LVI in 2022, the College Football Championship in 2023, and the Opening and Closing ceremonies for the Olympics in 2028.

Foundation CEO Steve Mitchell interviewed Vincent over Zoom earlier this year about his unique journey.

He is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps, enlisting shortly after graduating from high school. Following his service, he studied civil engineering at Cal State Poly-Pomona, where he became an SAE in his mid-twenties.

In addition to his work with Turner Construction, Vincent is active in several professional associations and his local community. He serves as a mentor for ACE Mentor Program of America, Inc., which supports high school students interested in architecture, construction, and engineering.

He is also the southern California liaison for Veterans Resource Group at Turner Construction, is a lecturer for USC’s Master of Business for Veterans program, and was the Keynote Speaker for Cal State Poly-Pomona’s Veteran Future Forward event.

Tune in today for this episode which focuses on the importance of goal setting, self-reflection, and getting out of your comfort zone. Vincent attributes his success to saying, “I want to be that guy,” and then finding a way to make it happen. Vincent also discusses the importance of his SAE membership, how it positively changed his life and encourages brothers to take advantage of their membership and all that it offers. We also asked him about all of the extraordinary aspects of So-Fi Stadium, from technology to infrastructure.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Watch Episode 1 of Season 3 on YouTube or listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

Since graduating from Frostburg State University, brother Chris Gonzalez ’00 has prided himself on giving back and doing his part in setting the youth up for the future based on his experiences.

As an active SAE, he was a part of the Big Brothers of America, but he’s always been someone who loves interacting with kids providing a positive environment.

Today, Gonzalez is a successful entrepreneur who founded A-G Associates in 2008. In 2017, his business received the Bridging the Gap Achievement Award by the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Future 50 Business Leaders Award by Smart CEO Magazine.

But he does more within his community.

The Maryland Delta alumnus supports the youth in Baltimore with the Mentoring Mentors program.

Brothers of Maryland Delta including Chris Gonzalez, the Mentoring Mentors Board of Directors President, Board Member Randy Belt, Board Member Terrence Myers, and the rest of the Mentor Mentors team with the Baltimore youth.

The Mentoring Mentors are a non-profit volunteer program for middle and high school students who support younger peers through long-term relationships, socio-emotional support, and networking for potential career opportunities.

Gonzalez is the Mentoring Mentors Board of Directors Chair. What’s unique is his brothers from Maryland Delta lead him to this role.

The Executive Director of Mentoring Mentors, Alphonso Mayo, coached football with Gonzalez under head coach and SAE Eric Woodson ’93. Mayo and Gonzalez helped coach the Northwestern and Glen Burnie High School football teams with Woodson in the past between 2012-2014. That relationship led to volunteering with Mentoring Mentors and eventually his role as the Board Chair in 2019.

Gonzalez credits staying involved with the Maryland Delta brothers with social media.

“A lot of what we do is high-level stuff in terms of promoting fundraising efforts, developing partnerships, and finding more board members and key relationships and just expanding the network for the organization,” Gonzalez said.

Photo via mentoring-mentors.org

Other Maryland Delta alums who work volunteer with Mentoring Mentors or contribute include Adam Fitzpatrick ’00, Nick Williams ’08, Matt Becker ’04, Randy Belt ’04, Ray Hamilton ’14, and Terrence Myers ’06.

Belt and Myers are both on the Board of Directors.

Myers is a Project Manager for Crown Castle, managing projects within the real estate development and telecommunications industry.

Photo via mentoring-mentors.org

Belt, a former football player and track & field athlete at Frostburg State, is a Lead Engineer in the Education sector at Proquest, LLC.

Photo via mentoring-mentors.org

“There’s been a ton of brothers from the Maryland Delta chapter that have been big contributors and it’s pretty cool,” Gonzalez said. “I find it to be great because I can combine both my worlds.”

“It’s pretty cool when you know some of these guys and you need something from them and they’re like, Alright, I’ll do it”.

Gonzalez, a former United States Marine, was actually in the reserves while a student at Frostburg State. In 2003, he was sent to Iraq with the infantry and returned to become an 8th-grade social studies teacher.

Teaching the youth lead to his passion for Mentoring Mentors today.

“I enjoyed working with the knuckleheads. I was kind of a knucklehead myself,” Gonzalez said. “So I related, even at 42 I still feel like I relate to kids. These young guys are just trying to act tough and try to impress girls and all that, I get it. I was in your shoes once.”

Gonzalez left the Marines, then rejoined again in 2010. In 2011, he went to Afghanistan, where he was focused on community engagement looking at stability as a whole. Once he returned to the states, Gonzalez took an interest in philanthropy for veterans. Through the years after his return, he realized there’s a lot of work to be done in the Baltimore community, where he’d been a part of for 20 years. 

“What I always found amazing about the Marine Corps, is you would have these dudes who would never be friends if it weren’t for the Marines,” Gonzalez said. “You have a dude from the inner city, a dude from the backwoods, a dude from the trailer park, a dude from a rich neighborhood, a guy who migrated from Mexico, ya know, you have all these dudes who are all thrown together and nobody cares. Everyone gets along, they don’t focus on differences, they just focus on being a Marine and that’s what bonds them. The fact that it’s such a strong support system is what puts them in a position to be successful.”

With Mentoring Mentors, Gonzalez compares his bond within the Marines and tries to channel it within the program.

“My interest with Mentoring Mentors is to help young men and young women build a support system,” he said. “Going to help develop drive, develop confidence, develop successful habits, and then help grow their network. You see my network is partially within my fraternity and partially in the military. My network is strong because of some of those different groups.”

“We’re creating a cycle of positive behavior. Everyone is so focused on what the problem is, no one ever focuses on what things actually work.”

Gonzalez said his chapter at Frostburg State was very diverse of all different backgrounds and is why he is trying to send a positive message to the youth still today.

“Just getting out of these stupid socio-economic bubbles that the media tells you to care about. Trying to connect people of different backgrounds because I think that’s how we’re better off.”

If you live in the Baltimore area and are interested in getting involved with the Mentoring Mentors, visit Mentoring Mentors’ website where there’s more information.

Recognizing a lifetime of service and loyalty to the Fraternity, the Distinguished Service Award is the highest individual award a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon may receive. Their actions exhibit their understanding of the Fraternity’s teachings, adherence to Fraternity Laws, attention to the promotion of its welfare, and exemplary conduct that guards well its honor and high standing.

The Fraternity has 345,000+ initiated members; only 147 have been recognized with the Distinguished Service Award. Curtis R. Frasier (Arizona State ‘77) is the most recent recipient, presented during the SAE Foundation Board of Trustees meeting by Eminent Supreme Archon Greg Brandt (Drake ‘84) and Eminent Supreme Warden Mike Rodgers (William & Mary ‘92).

 

“The Fraternity has always been an amazing place for me. A place where brotherhood is just inherent” said Frasier after receiving the award. “I’m humbled, I don’t deserve it, and thank you.”

Frasier was initiated at Arizona State University (Arizona Beta) in 1973 and held the positions of Eminent Herald, Member Educator, Recruitment Chairman, and Eminent Archon. After graduating in 1977, he served as Province Upsilon Archon, providing leadership for the collegians in Arizona and New Mexico and later as Province Sigma Archon for Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Frasier also served as a faculty member of Leadership School for ten years. In 2012, he was named to the SAE Foundation Board of Trustees, serving most recently as its Secretary.

In addition to his commitment to the Fraternity, Frasier spent over 30 years with the Shell Oil Company, ultimately serving as Executive Vice President & General Counsel, and eventually on its Board of Directors. He also assisted with the first-ever IPO to exceed $1 billion and served as the Distinguished Visiting Dorwart Chair in Energy Law at the University of Tulsa’s College of Law. He also served on board roles for The Center for American and International Law, the Institute for Energy Law, and Arizona State University, his alma mater.

Never one to boast of his achievements, Frasier’s best work was done behind the scenes, providing guidance and counsel to the Fraternity, Foundation, and his profession. There are countless people who have felt his reach and leadership, and even more so who will benefit for years to come.

Congratulations to Curtis R. Frasier, the 147th recipient of Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Distinguished Service Award.

Are you an upcoming senior or recently graduated alum? Are you uncertain of what’s next after your undergraduate career? Join Jeremy Bellman (University of New Haven ’19), Cody Delmendo (Eastern Illinois ’15), and Manager of Alumni Engagement, Ryan Gibbons (Tennessee Tech ’16), as they discuss how to best navigate life after college and the best tips and strategies to prepare you for success in your career.

The three discuss their experiences after graduating from college that includes applying for their first job as a post-graduate, relocating to a new home that takes them out of their comfort zone, and how they stayed involved with Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

Tune in to this episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, or if you prefer, SAE Fraternity episodes are available on YouTube. Click here to watch this month’s interview.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Like the Phoenix rose from the ashes, Jack Paul (’24) rose to the occasion when times were tough.

The freshman Criminal Justice major at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs finished his last chemotherapy treatment on April 9. Paul was diagnosed with Pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [ALL] in 2018 when he was a junior in high school.

Photo via uccs_ifc/Instagram

“It’s so weird that I’m not on chemo right now,” Paul said. “It’s weird to not have my dad nag me about taking my pills every day.”

Paul’s condition did not stop him from living his life. In his first semester at UCCS, he was lucky enough to have a roommate that was already part of the Colorado Phi chapter.

Because his roommate Owen was already part of the Colorado Phi chapter, he was invited out to rush events and eventually was given a bid and initiated.

“The stars aligned,” Paul said. “He brought me down to meet all the guys and they were all very welcoming and chill.”

He never thought he’d join a fraternity at first because of his condition but the brothers made him feel comfortable right away.

“I was like ‘I don’t know, man, I have cancer. I don’t know if having cancer and joining a fraternity is a good idea,’” Paul said. “It was very different from what I was expecting.”

With the thought of the infamous movie Animal House in his head, it was much different than he thought.

He learned quickly that the chapter is full of men who enjoy each other’s company while serving the community in different aspects.

Entering his college experience, Paul became open about the condition he had and it caught the eyes of his brothers. He became a hot commodity quickly as he’s shown his love for SAE throughout the first year of his college experience by visiting campus on weekends due to classes being online.

“I’m super open with it. I would always talk about it and joke about it,” Paul said. “I went to rush and then I got my bid. At no point did I ever feel like having cancer was going to limit me from still enjoying myself in the fraternity.”

“917 days, 157 chemotherapy infusions. Fuck Cancer. I’m done.” Photo via 2jack2/Instagram

Last semester, Paul traveled over an hour to visit his brothers on weekends. The brotherhood and everything the fraternity brought him helped him stay busy getting to the point he’s at now.

“I was running for a position and I told them, ‘Hey, I clearly love this fraternity. I’m driving an hour and a half just to hang out with everyone”.

Moving forward, Paul will only need to make hospital visits once a month for blood work and what he describes as a physical. He’ll also have to take certain medications until his immune system readjusts to normal.

“It’s very doubtful that I’ll have to go back on anything,” Paul said. “I never got hopeless, even when I first got diagnosed.”

According to St. Judes, about 98% of children with ALL go into remission within weeks after starting treatment. About 90% of those children can be cured. Patients are considered cured after 10 years in remission.

“Everything that happened to me, I would not be the first. There is plenty of research on it and my doctors have probably seen it personally before,” Paul said. “So I never felt hopeless during the pandemic or before it. It was just a matter of enduring all this treatment to get to survival.”

Next fall, Paul plans to live off-campus with eight of his brothers between two duplexes.

“I’m so excited. It’s going to be great,” he said.

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation Board of Trustees and the members of our Scholarship Selection Committee proudly announce our 2020-2021 academic year scholarship winners. These brothers excel in their personal, professional, and academic pursuits, and their accomplishments have earned recognition among their peers. This year, the Foundation awarded 29 scholarships totaling $88,000.

We thank our generous supporters, alumni, and friends, who make these scholarships possible. In addition, we encourage you to congratulate any winners you may know. The name of the scholarship, followed by the scholarship’s category or area of interest, and its respective recipients are listed below.

Robert Hamrdla Award (History)

Harrison Ledda (Mansfield University)

Past Eminent Supreme Recorder Bob Hamrdla (Stanford ’60) established this award for a brother in any major with transcripts that reflect considerable study of 19th and 20th-century history.

Jones-Lawerence Award (Academic Performance)

Brennan Cox (University of Georgia)

Josh Figus (Western Illinois University)

Established in memory of past Eminent Supreme Archon Walter B. Jones (Auburn ’10) and Philip J. Laurence (Minnesota ’15), the award is given to the brothers who display the most outstanding academic achievement.

Dr. Charles A. Preuss (Medical)

Kapil Reddy (Indiana State University)

Ethan Yang (Northwestern University)

Established in memory of Brother Dr. Charles A. Preuss (Idaho ’24), this award recognizes brothers attending or planning to attend medical school, or enrolled in a course of study related to medicine and who have demonstrated service to their community and fellow man.

Frank C. Ginocchio Professional Staff Leadership Scholarship (Health & Safety)

Spencer Dubbels (Morehead State University) 

Established in recognition of Brother Frank C. Ginocchio’s (Northwestern ’66) leadership while serving on the Sigma Alpha Epsilon staff, this scholarship recognizes brothers who have demonstrated a positive influence in the field of risk management.

Thomas W. Devine Volunteer Leadership Scholarship (Health & Safety)

Yianni Mercer (DePaul University)

Established in recognition of Brother Thomas W. Devine’s (Minnesota ’74) volunteer efforts on behalf of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, this scholarship recognizes brothers who have demonstrated a positive influence in the field of risk management.

W. Emil Forman Award (Community Service)

Nathan Gavelek (Colorado School Of Mines)

Senna Adachi (University of Cinncinati)

Brenden Wlodkowski (University of Toledo)

Aiden Ruble (Simpson College)

Jake Brend (Simpson College)

George Lippy (Western Carolina University)

Eddy Connors (University of Colorado-Boulder)

Alex Rogers (Bucknell University)

Jesse Jones (University of Cinncinati)

Dean Straton (Morehead State University)

Established in memory of Brother W. Emil Forman (Pennsylvania ’29), this award recognizes brothers who have shown extraordinary commitment to their community and fellow man as demonstrated by community service work.

Bradley M. Cohen Courage Award (Courage)

Peter Zhang (University of Missouri-Kansas City)

Past Eminent Supreme Archon Bradley M. Cohen (Arizona ’85) established this award to recognize brothers who have shown extraordinary courage in overcoming a major personal or organizational obstacle.

Ivan Allen Jr. Leadership Award

Tyler Allbritton (Nicholls State University)

Established in memory of Brother Ivan Allen Jr. (Georgia Tech ’33), this award was created by Atlanta-area brothers. The award is given to the brother whose leadership in the chapter and community demonstrates the spirit of Allen, a former Atlanta mayor.

Charles Collins Award for Outstanding Achievement

Phillip Necessary (University of Arkansas)

TJ Jacoby (South Dakota State University)

Nick Albers (University of Cincinnati)

Evan Sterling (Arizona State University)

Joshua Murillo (Western Illinois University)

George Lampen (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Chase Philport (Kettering University)

Sean Engler (Fort Hays State University)

Charles King (University of Missouri – Kansas City)

Carson King (Indiana University – Bloomington)

Styles Martin (East Tennessee State University)

Caleb McFarland (Simpson College)

Nicholas Purdie (University of Minnesota – Twin Cities)

Andrew Samrock (University of Minnesota – Twin Cities)

Gene Szyba (University of Colorado – Colorado Springs)

Established in memory of Brother Charles F. Collins (Boston ’12), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service in the Fraternity, on the campus and in the community.

Fred Archibald Leadership Award

Remy Lodrigues (Nicholls State University)

Edward Major (Centre College)

Established in memory of Brothers Fred J. Archibald (Cornell ’45) and his father, Fred I. Archibald (Nebraska ’14), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in their chapter, community and school.

Richard Generelly Leadership Award

Dante Filpula Ankney (University of Montana)

Stanton Thomas (Oklahoma State University)

Kieran Mangla (College of William & Mary)

Ethan Buck (Purdue University)

Logan Canada-Johnson (University of Puget Sound)

Established in memory of past ESA Richard Generelly (George Washington ’47), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in their chapter, community, and school.

Warren P. Poslusny Award For Outstanding Achievement

Conor Emery (California State University, Sacramento)

Rhett Theobald (Embry-Riddle Areonautical University)

Matthew Te Slaa (South Dakota State University)

Alex Glauthier (University of Mount Union)

Frank Cruz (Simpson College)

Collin Fiorentini (Simpson College)

Nick Giambrone (Simpson College)

Gabe Gross (Simpson College)

Nick Hanna (Simpson College)

Past Honorary Eminent Supreme Archon and former Foundation Trustee Warren Paul “Pos” Poslusny (Kettering ’69) established this award to recognize brothers who have demonstrated an enthusiastic commitment to the highest ideals expressed in “The True Gentleman” including exceptional personal integrity while leading chapter and campus activities, coupled with notable philanthropic service and scholastic achievement.

Trustees Award for Scholarship and Service

Logan Wolf (South Dakota State University)

Funded by Foundation Trustees, this award recognizes brothers who demonstrate quality involvement in campus and chapter leadership positions, particularly the measure of his contribution to the education of his chapter brothers.

 

The chapter at Embry-Riddle [AZ] was honored for multiple awards at the University’s annual Leadership awards ceremony last month.

The awards were Chapter of Principle, Chapter of Fellowship, Chapter of Giving, and also Outstanding Chapter of the Year. One brother stood out as well.

Matthew Martinez (’21) was honored with the Outstanding Community Service to commend his continued relationship with the Desert Southwest Alzheimer’s Association.

It was the first award Martinez won and a special one.

“It’s a tremendous feeling. The chapter has been helping out with the Desert Southwest Alzheimer’s Association since my freshman year,” Martinez said. “One of our brothers was just driving and heard on the radio that they needed volunteers. That’s where it began.”

“We help out with their annual walk that’s in our downtown square. The relationship with them has been kept going forward since my freshman year. The brother that was the main contact for them graduated, so he pretty much put it all on me.”

The walk is known as the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. It is held annually at over 600 communities worldwide and is one of the largest events to help raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support, and research.

With the COVID-19 pandemic, the organization was unable to do the walk this semester, but it didn’t stop Arizona Delta.

The organization did a virtual-type fundraiser this spring. With Arizona Delta’s help, they were able to raise $1,200 in the fall of 2020.

Since Martinez was a senior, he helped pass on the duty to an incoming freshman who was in charge of the fundraiser this spring.

They did another virtual event, but this time it was on the gaming platform Twitch. The chapter did a 12-hour long gaming marathon that included guest speakers from the Alzheimer’s Association to speak live on the stream. The chapter raised over $3,500.

Martinez’s grandmother passed away due to Alzheimer’s so working with the association is something he takes great pride in.

“Just to give back to an organization is big, because their main goal is to help find a cure,” Martinez said. “It’s very rewarding for me and also my family.”

The Arizona Delta chapter was founded in 2000. Martinez, now graduated, hopes to become a pilot after he passes all his certifications.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s 20 Under 40 Successful Alumni: 2021 List

All of these individuals were nominated and completed an application for consideration. Evaluators scored applicants on SAE involvement, professional achievements, community involvement, and leadership.

If you know a young alumnus deserving of recognition, please email foundation@sae.net. Individuals must be alumni members in good standing and under 40-years-old by March 31, 2022. 

James Balandran (Texas-Dallas ’10) 

James is the Chief Operating Officer for Vudu Consulting LP and has started several companies throughout his career. He also works with Rock the Campus, raising money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, and partnered with Oklahoma Community Cares to distribute $200M in CARES Act funds. James remains involved in SAE and currently serves as the Province Sigma Archon.


Aaron Bernasconi (Fort Hays State ’10) 

Recently, Aaron served as the Senior Advisor to Deputy United States Trade Representative Ambassador C.J. Mahoney. He played a role in negotiating the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, which Congress passed in 2020 with bipartisan support. Fort Hays State University recognized Aaron as Young Alumni of the Year in 2020. He is active in the Kansas Delta Alumni Association and his church.


Ross Biestman (UC-Berkeley ’07)

Ross is the Chief Revenue Officer for ServiceTitan and an Executive in Residence for Bessemer Venture Partners. He previously served as Vice President of Sales for Lithium Technologies, which Vista Equity Partners acquired and co-founded Stealth HD, Inc., which Amazon acquired. Ross is a board member for the SAE California Beta Educational Institute and Cal Rugby Advisory Board.


Matthew Brooks (Loyola-Chicago ’06)

Matthew is the Global Sales Director for Enterprise DB. Previously he worked for IBM, most recently as a Strategic Clients Account Executive for IBM Data & AI and North America Sales Leader for Watson Data & AI Platform. He consistently exceeded his target goals, and IBM recognized his professional success as a member of their 100 Percent Club.


Austin Bury (Georgetown ’15)

Austin is a Security Consultant for Torch Technologies providing support for Department of Defense initiatives. He previously served four years in the United States Marine Corps and attained the rank of Captain. As a Marine, Austin completed several certifications and in 2020 received the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal for his achievements as part of an intelligence team in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

Brendan Calamito (Florida Southern ’16)

Brendan is a Senior Manager of Credit Risk for Fidelity Investments specializing in hedge funds and is a CFA Charterholder. Brendan serves his community as Treasurer and Board Member of Community Learning Center. He remains involved in SAE as Chapter Advisor for Massachusetts Beta-Alpha and Vice President of the Florida Gamma Alumni Association.


Logan Davidson (Texas Tech ’17)

Logan is a Legislative Director for the Texas House of Representatives. Throughout his career, he has volunteered and worked for several campaigns and state representatives. Over the past year, Logan worked to ensure proper staffing at various food banks throughout Texas with Powered by the People. Logan has also focused on registering and engaging voters with several organizations.


Darren Deoraj (Hartford ’12)

Darren is the Director of the Department of Urology for Mount Sinai Beth Israel. The American College of Healthcare Executives gave him the 2018 Early Career Healthcare Executive Regent’s Award. He is active in several professional organizations, including as Secretary for Healthcare Leaders of New York. He is Chapter Advisor and Alumni Advisory Board Member for Connecticut Lambda. 


Chester Donnally III, MD (Southern Methodist ’09)

Chester recently completed his fellowship at Rothman Orthopaedic Institute and is a surgeon for Texas Spine Consultants, specializing in minimally invasive and complex spine surgery. He has been published over 50 times in professional journals, contributed to several book chapters, presented to colleagues on various topics at professional conferences, and is a member of several professional associations.


Patrick Fredricks Assistant Director of Admission

Patrick Fredricks (Central Michigan ’10)

Patrick is the Assistant Director of Admissions for Fort Lewis College, where he created an award-winning online orientation. He is on the school’s COVID-19 Leadership Team as the Campus Life Chair and has completed certifications and training focusing on mental health and diversity topics. He remains active with SAE by serving as a faculty member for many educational programs.


SONY DSC

Alexander Fusaro (Hartford ’16)

Alex is a Digital Consultant for eBizSelect.net. He was recognized as Newsday’s Media Person of the Year in 2019 and received the University of Hartford’s Presidential Leadership Award in 2016. He is a member of Huntington’s Young Professionals Committee. Alex recently volunteered with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Long Island, delivering holiday meals and gifts to local families.


John Rivers III (Centre ’11)

John is an Agency Fit Consultant for LEAP Group. In 2020 LEAP received several awards for work where he was directly involved. He also received several professional recognitions, including making Louisville Business First’s Forty Under 40 list. John supports several nonprofit organizations in his community and remains active in SAE as President of the Louisville Area Alumni Association.


Trey Rome (Southern Methodist ’08) 

Trey is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Home Tax Solutions, the largest property tax loan originator in Texas. Under Trey’s leadership, Home Tax Solutions has received several awards and accolades, and he made Dallas Business Journal’s Forty Under 40 list in 2020. Additionally, Trey and Home Tax Solutions support several non-profit organizations throughout the year.


Dylan Silva (Long Island ’18)

Dylan is an Officer, Program Oversight Specialist for Bank of America, and is active in several professional organizations. Dylan is also an advocate for the Be Nice Foundation, spreading awareness about the importance of mental health. He remains involved with SAE as the Alumni Advisor for Michigan Gamma and the Chapter Advisor for South Carolina Nu.


Nathan Tallman (Central Michigan ’07)

Nathan is Vice President of Metro Wire & Cable, and his contributions have earned Metro Wire regular industry recognition. Additionally, he has received several individual recognitions, including making DBusiness Magazine’s Thirty Under 30 list in 2019. Nathan supports his community as a leader on several boards and stays active in SAE as President of the Michigan Delta-Omega Alumni Association.


Tyler Thompson (Virginia Commonwealth ’13) 

Tyler is a volunteer firefighter for the Citizens’ Hose Company. He serves as Captain for the Kent County Special Operations Team and Team Leader of the Kent County Water Rescue Team. Additionally, Tyler is involved in various community service projects as a Freemason and serves as President of the Smyrna Police Athletic League. 


Preston Van Buren, DO (Puget Sound ’13)

Commander Van Buren is a General Medical Officer for the United States Navy, currently posted in Japan. He is published in various medical journals and regularly presents on orthopedic procedures, programs, and management. Preston is also an advocate for the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program, which assists victims with resources from the U.S. Navy.


Brian Vasquez (Iowa ’10) 

Brian is Vice President of Par Logistics, Inc., growing the company from $5M in revenue to over $35M in just eight years. Brian is also the Founder and President of Landshark Realty, LLC. He is devoted to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, serving as a Wish Grantor and board member for the Make-A-Wish annual Walk for Wishes event. 


Shawn Wood (UC-Davis ’06)

Shawn is the President of Student Movers, Inc., which is Pro Mover Certified by the American Moving & Storage Association. He is also a graduate of AMSA’s Leadership School. Shawn is active in his community as President of Kiwanis Huntington Beach and board member for Kindervision and Huntington Beach Woman of the Year. He also supports several community organizations.

 

Tune in today for a conversation where Cody and Jeremy discuss the importance of mental health and how it carries over into your chapters. In this episode, Dylan Silva (Long Island ’18), shares his experience being a mental health advocate and the best practices for positive mental health among individuals.

John Ligouri, a current undergrad from the University of Connecticut-New Haven (Connecticut Nu-Eta), shares how significant mental health is among his chapter and the best ways to retain brotherhood among members.

Dylan, an alumnus from New York Beta, is an advocate for the Be Nice Foundation. He remains involved with Sigma Alpha Epsilon as the Alumni Advisor for Michigan Gamma and the Chapter Advisor for South Carolina Nu. Ligouri ’22 is a junior majoring in Criminal Justice. He’s held four different positions within his chapter: Philanthropy Chairman, Community Service Chairman, Eminent Recorder, and Eminent Deputy Archon.

Tune in to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or if you prefer, SAE Fraternity episodes are available on YouTube. Click here to watch this month’s interview.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Nearly 20% of Americans have a diagnosable mental condition. Sigma Alpha Epsilon is committed to the health and well-being of our members and, in May, joins the national movement to raise awareness about mental health. Together, we can get the appropriate support to those affected by mental illness, so no one feels alone.

Help us spread the word through awareness, support, and advocacy activities. Below are a variety of different ways brothers can get involved to promote and learn more about mental health awareness. 

QPR

QPR stands for Questions, Persuade, and Refer – the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide. SAE provides the QPR Gatekeeper training to all collegiate active members and one alumni advisor per chapter/colony. To register for this training, log into MySAE and visit the Events section through the month of May.

Brothers who have already taken this training showed significant growth in their knowledge and understanding of suicide prevention. They also showed significant growth in their confidence and competence to carry out the QPR intervention. Here are a few impressive statistics from our brothers who have already completed QPR Training:

  • 100% of SAE participants believe this training will help them in helping someone who is suicidal.
  • Upon completion, 94% of brothers who took the training had a high knowledge of facts concerning suicide prevention at the end.
  • Upon completion, 88% of brothers who took the training had a high knowledge of how to ask someone about suicide.
  • Upon completion, 88% of brothers who took the training had a high knowledge of how to persuade someone to get help.
  • Upon completion, 91% of brothers who took the training felt confident in their ability to help a suicidal person.

Online Learning

SAE provides a module on mental health through our online learning platform, which you can access through MySAE.

Campus Resources

Many colleges and universities provide a wealth of mental health resources and education. Many of these are often free or low-cost to students and are great collaborations for educational programming.

Find your Counseling Center on campus and reach out to them about virtual programming and resources available to students. Most campus Counseling Centers will offer support groups, individual counseling, and educational programs or resources they could present to your chapter/colony

Movember Opportunities in May

Movember is hosting virtual events this month to celebrate and promote Mental Health Awareness Month.

  • Tuesday, May 11, at 5:30 pm CT a community workout with Kenny Santucci, a Mo Bro, mental health advocate, and one of New York City’s top trainers. The workout is hosted via Zoom and good for all fitness levels (and don’t worry – your camera won’t be on). Physical activity plays an important role in mental health and Movember wants to get everyone up and moving. You can sign up here.
  • May 20th and 21st, Movember is hosting virtual panel discussions about the challenges to mental health and wellbeing for Black, Indigenous and People of Color. These will be safe spaces for healthy dialogues with experts and people who have lived experience or work in the mental health space. Join them on Facebook Live for these important conversations.
  • Applications to become a Movember Student Ambassador are open. You can apply here.

Get Support

People often don’t get the mental health services they need because they don’t know where to start.

Talk to your primary care physician or use these resources to find help for yourself, your brothers, your friends, or your family.

Emergency Medical Services—911

If a situation is potentially life-threatening, get immediate emergency assistance by calling 911, available 24 hours a day.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or Live Online Chat

If you or someone you know is suicidal or in emotional distress, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Trained crisis workers are available to talk 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and provide crisis counseling and mental health referrals.

SAMHSA Treatment Referral Helpline, 1-877-SAMHSA7 (1-877-726-4727)

Get general information on mental health and locate treatment services in your area. Speak to a live person, Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST.

The men at the University of California-Riverside recently raised $15,947 for their philanthropy, Miss Minerva, this spring. The total actually surpassed their previous record of $11,000. All proceeds will go to the Children’s Miracle Network.

Photo via ucr_sae/instagram

Miss Minerva has been the chapter’s philanthropy for seven years and the men at California Omicron have increased their total each year since it launched.

The event followed the previous year’s format of a points-based system where each participating contestant earns points for each student organization participating via various fundraising events, competitions, and social media outreach. The points raise money and awareness for the Children’s Miracle Network.

Philanthropy chairmen Vincent Castro ’21 and Bryce Biship ’21 organized this year’s record-breaking event that has grown each year the chapter has launched it.

It’s something pretty important to us,” Castro said. “We wanted to do it for the kids so we wanted to continue to do it even though we were in an online situation for school.”

Normally the chapter will have a table set up on campus for the event. With the event virtual this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations got involved through the live feature on Instagram.

“We kind of restructured the whole thing to bring it to an online environment and it was crazy successful,” Biship said.

Three days a week for three weeks, the chapter would do Instagram Live posts where brothers and other members of the Greek community could join and interact and donate to the philanthropy.

One of the popular events the chapter would conduct live has become known as PiAlpha, where if you donated to the cause, brothers would get pied in the face.

The final point of the event was a pageant contest.

“It’s really great because sometimes the girls either have family that was treated by Children’s Miracle Hospitals and there’s a lot of really close ties to this and it always comes through,” Biship said. “You never really expect it, but every time the contestants have some big tie to it.”

“We’re a small chapter, about 30-35 members, so, everyone in the chapter stepped up and helped.”

In past years, the chapter had only got involved with panhellenic sororities but this year they included many other organizations in the greek community to create more inclusion.

“We really see this event as a huge outreach where we can kind of show what greek life is all about and kind of remove the negative stigma towards it,” Biship said.

The men from California Omicron have been on campus at California Riverside since 1990.

A brother from Salem State has been given an award for his work within his chapter.

Bryan Gargan ’21, a senior at Massachusetts Tau-Gamma, was awarded the John Sorenson Unsung Hero Award back on April 27.

The award is given to a student in an organization who exceeds expectations by going “above and beyond the call of duty” in service to their group.

The award named after John Sorenson, who a member of the Facilities Department at Salem State University for over twenty years, worked tirelessly to care for the buildings on campus and the people in it.

Like Sorenson, Gargan went above and beyond in this chapter to help in any way he could.

“I never thought that I would win an award for being a Student Leader, much less an award where I ‘exceed expectations in the call of duty’ for my Brothers,” Gargan said.

“I am extremely humbled and honored to have been nominated, chosen, and won this award because becoming a brother of Sigma Alpha Epsilon was possibly the best choice I have made in my college career. The opportunities and friendships that I gained through it are invaluable to me, and I have learned so much about leadership and community service through this Fraternity that it has become one of the best learning experiences of my life.”

Gargan has held various executive positions within the Massachusetts Tau-Gamma chapter and took a larger role in recruitment using his experience as a way to attract potential new members.

All around the country, many alumni have taken it upon themselves to network and keep the bond of being a part of Sigma Alpha Epsilon together after graduation.

In this case, over the course of seven years, men from the Phoenix area have grown the SAE Phoenix Alumni, Inc. into one of the largest alumni organizations across the Realm.

“It’s evolved into something impactful,” President Bo Sederstrom ’83 said. “We’re just getting started. We’re trying to get younger alums involved and focusing on career and personal development. We’re just scratching the surface. We’ve crafted a template for the future of the alumni association.”

Phoenix is home to nearly 2,800 SAE brothers from over 221 different chapters.

In 1997, graduated brothers created a local alumni association related to the Arizona Beta chapter. Fast forward to 2015, lead by Joe Laux and Tom Healy, the SAE Phoenix Alumni, Inc. was re-chartered to focus on all chapters in Province Upsilon as well as alumni from every SAE chapter represented in metro Phoenix.  The new board was made up of SAEs from Nebraska, Texas, Ohio, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Arizona.

As of today, the alumni association controls over $200,000 in investments that go towards scholarships and awards locally.

“It’s not as hard as it seems. It takes one or two key people,” President-elect Stan Strom ’82 said. “You can’t believe how many SAEs live in this area. We’ve seen significant growth and been switching the leadership every couple of years so no one gets burnt out. People come because they’re getting something out of it.”

There are no fees to join the SAE Phoenix Alumni except for the actual cost of each event. The events are planned monthly through the year in different locations around Phoenix and at times to maximize attendance.

“The bottom line is, now going into the eighth year of this new group, imitation is the biggest form of flattery,” Strom said. “It’s a cool thing to know people are at your heels. You take the best practices like we have and put them into effect. If we can be the message for others out there, we’re here to help.”

Most members are older and are looking for more brothers. However, they did get a nice surprise at their most recent event last year.  

In October of 2020, the association had its first in-person event during the COVID-19 pandemic. They even were pleased to be welcomed by Super Bowl champion Ted Frederick ’55, an alumnus from Penn State, who went on to play football professionally with the Miami Dolphins.

Despite their success, there are still things the association hopes to improve on for the future.

“I think the alumni association will continue to evolve and continue to get better,” Sederstrom said. “We don’t discourage making mistakes because we’re always trying to do new things. One thing I’ve noticed at conventions, several members identify their Alumni Association with one person. We believe the identity of the association needs to be the whole association, not one or two brothers.”

If you’re interested in joining the association or if you’re in the Phoenix area for a weekend, visit their website to get involved.

The men from Youngstown State (Ohio Alpha) dominated the playing field in the school’s annual greek awards this academic year.

The chapter landed No. 1 for Top Academic Fraternity, Top Fraternity Philanthropy, Fraternity Of The Year, and Greek Sing.

It is back-to-back-to-back years the chapter has won Fraternity Of The Year.

Photo via sae.youngstown/facebook

“This was one the hardest years ever,” Eminent Archon Nick Koupiaris ’21 said. “The morale at the beginning was low, but the thing was we are an organization that rises above like the Phoenix from the ashes. This year just proved we’re not just all talk. That’s something to be proud of.”

The newly-elected student body President will be continuing his education through Youngstown State’s masters program. He helped lead Ohio Alpha to a 3.25 GPA.

The chapter raised $3,515 through their philanthropy ‘Grilled Cheese With The SAE‘. It was the most they’ve raised since the chapter began the event.

The men finished up a successful year taking home first place in Greek Sing as well.

Ohio Alpha has been at Youngstown State since 1959. They were a John O. Moseley Zeal Award Nominee in 2020.

A class of brothers from Mother Mu went out of their way to help a brother in need.

 

Mike Slaughter, Alabama ’77, was in a financial bundle, and his brothers he’s known since his time as an active SAE came through for him, buying him a 2004 Dodge Ram.

“It was a wonderful thing that they did for me. It shows you what they can do for you, even 40 years later. The True Gentlemen is still out there,” Slaughter said.

Bryan Christopher, one of Mike’s pledge brothers, helped start the process of raising money for Mike’s cause.

“Mike was one of, if not the most, well-liked pledge brothers in our class of 26,” Christopher said. “Our pledge class training was focused on building a strong bond within us and the important history of our chapter and the principles of being a True Gentleman.”

Mike hasn’t lived the easiest life after a 10 year period of alcoholism and rehab. Like the Phoenix from the ashes, Mike rose and turned a negative part of his life into a positive.

Today, he’s a retired therapist and drug education mentor for juveniles but started a landscaping company, Greenman Landscaping and Design, in 2018.

“A few years after college Mike had entered a path of self-destruction and burned many bridges, took advantage and abused many of his brother’s friendship and bond,” Christopher said.

Bryan heard Mike was back in his hometown of Dothan, AL in 2018 when they rekindled their friendship like old times.

“I started stopping by to visit him and just like old times we were united again. I could see Mike was working hard in his landscaping business and he would not stop asking questions about everyone else in our pledge class,” Christopher said.

Needing a way of transportation became a problem and his brothers from the pledge class of 1975 came through for him, donating $7,000 to help him purchase his truck.

Christopher was the leader in contacting all the brothers from their pledge class and begun raising money for a vehicle.

“He would push his equipment himself to his jobs,” Christopher said. “I sent out a request for donations to our pledge class brothers to help get Mike a truck assuring them that Mike had turned the corner in his life and was on solid ground again. The checks just started flying in.”

Four months later, Christopher and the rest of the pledge class presented the truck to Mike.

“Mike was so thankful and happy to know his pledge class still cared deeply about him and we all certainly do,” Christopher said.

“I’m blessed to have my health, good friends, and now this kind of thing. SAE made me who I am,” Slaughter said. “It was hard for me to get back, it was hard for me to get my business going. The guys really stepped up to bat for me.”

These events have led to a reunion this fall at the Alabama Mu house to celebrate what they call the ‘Best Class Ever’.

“100 percent of our pledge class recently purchased a brick at the house to commemorate our class,” Christopher said. “We have had a 95 percent positive response to attend our reunion. I predict it will be 100 percent when the time comes around. To say our group is exceptional is simply an understatement. Our bond is unbreakable.”

Mike will always remember there are tough times and it can get dark. Even so, there is a light at the end of the tunnel, just this time the light was his brothers.

The fourth episode of season 2 features Marc Malnati, SAE alumnus, and owner of Chicago’s famous deep-dish pizza chain, Lou Malnati’s. Foundation CEO Steve Mitchell interviewed Marc over Zoom late last year. Marc is the son of Lou Malnati, founder of Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria. Shortly before his father passed away, Marc graduated from Indiana and started working for the family business, a business that has grown from just three locations at the time to 64 locations today. In addition to their restaurants, Lou Malnati’s is also the largest shipper of pizza worldwide. Through Tastes of Chicago, they ship 500,000 pizzas across the country yearly as well as other Chicago specialties.  In addition to his work as chairman of Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria, Marc is also the Co-Founder of the Marc & Jeanne Malnati Family Foundation, co-chair of the Lou Malnati Cancer Research Foundation, and board member for the Northwestern Medicine Lou and Jean Malnati Brain Tumor Institute.

Tune in today for a thoughtful conversation focusing on people, relationships, and how they can contribute to an individual’s success. We decided to name it Emotional Intelligence because of Marc’s firm belief in the importance of learning more about yourself and how you interact with others. He attributes his success to these lessons as well as surrounding himself with good people.

TG Talk is brought to you by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation and Fraternity and is an opportunity to engage with staff, volunteers, undergraduates, and notable alumni. Join us for discussions on all things SAE, including chapter operations, alumni engagement, university relations, ritual, and values. Additionally, TG Talk is a speaker series. We feature guest speakers focusing on leadership, professional development, and current events. As True Gentlemen, we must always strive to rise above. One of the ways we do that is by continuously learning.

If you have ideas for upcoming topics, questions, or if your chapter has exciting news to share with the Realm, connect with us at communications@sae.net. You can find the podcast by searching for TG Talk on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or the Anchor app.

We look forward to connecting with you. Be sure to subscribe to receive notifications when new episodes are available.

Watch Episode 4 of Season 2 on YouTube or listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation is pleased to announce a new national scholarship fund, The Fleur-de-lis Fund.

With the goal to increase access to Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the Fleur-de-lis Fund establishes a scholarship to benefit underrepresented brothers in the Fraternity. Province Sigma Archon, James Balandrán (Texas-Dallas ‘10), was one of the many that saw an unfulfilled need to support inclusivity within SAE, inspiring the start of this fund, which intends to lessen the financial burden of fraternity membership.

James said, “As the largest Fraternity, SAE has brothers from many diverse backgrounds. First-generation college students, non-traditional students, students on scholarship; these are a few examples of members we are looking to support with scholarships from this fund. We also wanted to create a vessel where we can assist members when tragedy strikes, like when Hurricane Harvey hit Houston in 2018. Removing barriers to be a fraternity man is our ultimate goal.”

James is an avid supporter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon through volunteering and monetary support of the Foundation. As someone who never considered joining a fraternity himself, he was struck by the True Gentleman’s message, which convinced him to join his roommates as a member. James says of this fund’s mission, “We want to make sure that we are being inclusive and providing for the needs of our members in every way possible. The fund’s mission is congruent with the Fraternity’s mission of advancing the highest standards of friendship, scholarship, leadership, and service for our members throughout life.”

Why the name Fleur-de-lis Fund? James gives all the credit to Province Nu-Epsilon Archon, Chris Slott, who spent a lot of time researching the fleur-de-lis and its meaning. The fleur-de-lis symbolizes SAE’s unity through honor; the three petals of the flower, representing our membership, are equal and united by a common heart, our ritual, uniting us. The fleur-de-lis represents this scholarship because all brothers are equal and unified by our organization’s ideals, no matter their background.

The advisory board for the Fleur-de-lis Fund is also unique in that it consists of a diverse group of members and nonmembers who understand the value that Greek life can have on an individual’s college experience and life regardless of their background. When asked to recall his favorite SAE memory, James said it’s hard to pick just one and that he values the ongoing relationships he’s made as an undergraduate and alumnus. In the end, it is the mission and hope of this fund to allow more individuals to experience all that fraternity life has to offer and share similar memories and experiences.

To make a donation, please click here and select Fleur-de-lis Fund from the dropdown menu. Thank you to the donors below for being the first to contribute to this fund.

  • James Xavier Balandran (Texas-Dallas ’10)
  • Nickolas Brown (Sonoma State ’13)
  • Michael James Corelli (Northern Illinois ’01)
  • Austin John Evans, Esq. (Wisconsin-Madison ’05)
  • Curtis R. Frasier (Arizona State ’77)
  • Christopher Wayne Hancock (Indiana State ’96)
  • Damon Bret Hirschensohn (Sonoma State ’98)
  • Ethan Zachary Lipsker (San Jose State ’19)
  • Jesus Manuel Maldonado
  • Steven D Mitchell (Indiana ’83)
  • Richard Brian Shanahan (Fort Hays State ’03)
  • Christopher Ashley Slott (North Florida ’08)
  • Shay Michael Stewart (Sonoma State ’96)
  • Martin R. Vindiola (Sonoma State ’13)

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of a new national scholarship fund; The Law Enforcement Memorial Fund, which was built by the frontline workers who help keep our brothers and communities safe every day. This fund will benefit the children of SAE law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty and brothers pursuing a career in law enforcement.

In 2018, SAE proudly unveiled the Law Enforcement and Officer Memorial statue at the Levere Memorial Temple.

The memorial was designed to honor brothers who have fallen since 2000. Province Chi Archon Matt Jones (Cal Poly-Pomona ’97) was present the day the memorial was revealed and is now going another step forward, leading the charge to start this new scholarship.

The San Diego native worked for the Los Angeles Police Department for 11 years before being medically retired after an accident working in the field. Today he works for the County of Riverside as the Safety and Threat Assessment Coordinator in Riverside, CA.

The memorial was inspired after Jones learned about many police officers who were in SAE. However, two fallen brothers stuck out to him.

“Come to find out, there’s a ton of cops in SAE,” Jones said. “I want to say it was 2015, I got a call from the Province Archon at the time, and he told me that a member of California Epsilon, who was a police officer in Bakersfield, had been killed in the line of duty.”

After those two deaths, Jones began the process of raising money for the memorial that was eventually revealed in 2018 at the Levere Memorial Temple.

Jones and many brothers he met along the way were able to partner with chapters across the Realm to host fundraising events. The brothers at Maine Alpha were the first to contribute to the cause.

“We fundraised, fundraised, and fundraised, and then the idea of a scholarship started to form because, at that point, we had more money than we knew what to do with. The statue was already covered, and so that’s when the scholarship started,” Jones said.

Jones started a Facebook page called the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Law Enforcement Memorial, where many police officers across the Realm share stories of fallen brothers.

“I started compiling more and more cops. They’re out there,” Jones said.

“This thing is never going to stop as long as I’m alive. I’m going to keep fundraising for this, and I’m going to do whatever I can to make that fund grow,” Jones said. “We have a lot of guys that are in law enforcement that I just wouldn’t have thought. It’s just amazing how many you find, and it’s just going to keep growing.”

This scholarship is available to members who are pursuing a career in law enforcement and children of brothers killed in the line of duty.

To contribute to this fund, please click here and select Law Enforcement Memorial Fund from the dropdown menu.

The California Iota chapter at Fresno State University and National Raisin teamed up
to raise $22,785 for the Armenian Missionary Association of America (AMAA).

National Raisin matched $10,000 that the fraternity raised for the AMAA ‘Shogh’ Day Centers.

The centers are located in Yerevan, Gyumri, Vanadzor in Armenia, and Shushi and Askeran in Artsakh and act as educational after-school programs serving nearly 290 children ranging from ages 6-12 years old from socially underserved families.

The centers offer hot meals, educational support, summer camps, fine art classes, and more, all targeted at lifting families out of poverty.

Eminent Archon Matt Astone (’23), who is of Armenian descent, shared what the donation meant to the chapter.

“In the fall, we closed our chapter house due to the pandemic. Seeing our members
rally around this cause and achieve this level of philanthropy is a testament to the strength of our brotherhood,” Astone said.

Armenia has been involved in a six-week-long conflict with Azerbaijan in the fall of 2020 over the region Nagorno-Karabakh. Another Armenian member of the fraternity, Daniel Abdulian (’22), believes in this cause and wanted to help in any way he could.

“This issue is close at heart for my family. Knowing the recent events in Armenia, our
brotherhood wanted to help those that need it the most,” Abdulian said.

Astone and Abdulian are two of seven Armenian descent and brothers at California Iota.

The fraternity wants to thank everyone who donated and for National Raisin’s generosity. In April, they will be raising money for Valley Children’s Hospital in Madera, CA through the
Children’s Miracle Network.

An alumnus from the Mississippi Gamma chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon has been named one of nine inaugural recipients of the Pillar of Fraternity & Sorority Life Award at the University of Mississippi.

Nominations began in November and were accepted until January 15.

Charlie Williams, Ole Miss ’66, has been recognized for the award for his contributions to the Greek community at Ole Miss.

He’s now retired and living in Oxford and is the Mississippi Gamma Chapter Advisor. Williams’ commitment to community engagement, success in his career, and dedication to fraternity and sorority life stood out among many participants that ultimately lead him this honor.

“It’s been a very rewarding opportunity for me and an opportunity to give back to the chapter,” Williams said. “Several people have been chosen this first year. I was nominated and I appreciate it very much. To the members and the alumni who recommended me too, I’m honored and I appreciate very much the confidence in those who considered me.”

Williams will receive the award this September at The Inn on Ole Miss’s campus.

We all have a deep understanding that the friendships we find in SAE last a lifetime, but what do we do when the life of one of our beloved is tragically cut short? We honor his legacy and strengthen the bonds of the brotherhood that brought us together in the first place.

The Colorado Alpha chapter at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) tragically lost brother Jason Birch in the summer of 1997. 

Jason suffered a fatal car accident shortly after he graduated from UNC. Birch was not only a member of SAE but also the captain of the university’s lacrosse team. Both shaped Jason into the kind of friend many wanted to have.

“It was a total shock and tragedy. From that, like the Phoenix from the ashes, rose this event. From adversity, we found an opportunity to bring everyone together,” says fellow Brother Brad Milley (Nothern Colorado ’99).

Milley said when he and his undergraduate brothers attended UNC, Jason was someone everyone in the chapter looked up to.

“He was one of the nicest guys that took the time to get to know everyone. Everyone looked up to him not only because of his kind demeanor but his maturity and athleticism. He was a stud athlete. Everybody knew Birch and everybody loved Birch,” Milley said.

From this tragedy rose an annual memorial golf tournament that grew over the last 25 years that honors the memory of a beloved brother. 

Jason’s brothers wanted to celebrate his life by holding a golf tournament. To the surprise of all, one tournament became an annual event.

“At those first couple tournaments, it was really just brothers,” Milley said. “It was pretty small. We never once figured this would be an annual thing, ‘we’re going to do this forever and we’re going to move to Denver and still do this,’ but eventually, it evolved and we went to a few different golf courses over the years.”

Several years after the tournament began, Jason’s friends and family realized that they could honor his legacy by paying it forward to other college students and created The Birch Memorial Fund.

The fund is a non-profit that provides scholarships to future University of Northern Colorado students that attended Jason’s former high school.

“It evolved into this whole other thing where it’s not just brothers. It’s friends and family, friends of friends. We have sponsors, huge prizes for everybody, and after awards party,” Milley said. “At the center of it all, it’s about one thing and that’s remembering Jason and who he was as a person, as a son, and as a brother. All of that and we’ve been able to give back and keep his spirit alive.”

The Birch Memorial Fund is now proud to be recognized as an official 501(c)(3) non-profit.

Today, the event acts as the chapter’s alumni event and is open to not only all SAEs of all ages but to anyone wanting to enjoy the camaraderie that comes with a round of golf in honor of a tremendous person.

This year’s tournament will be held on August 7 at the beautiful Arrowhead Golf Course in Littleton, Colorado. Registration is currently open but is expected to sell out in the coming months. Businesses also interested in sponsoring the event can find out how to financially support the Birch Memorial Fund on the website.

“We’re looking for other ways to give back to the community and keep his spirit alive and that kind of goes with the next generation. It’s awesome to get the next round of SAE’s and non-SAE’s involved to know it’s going to be around another 25 years,” Milley says.

Just as the Phoenix rose from the ashes, honoring the memory of a brother is a mighty symbol of the good that can arise from a tragedy. Jason’s legacy will continue.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon is back with another great show. Tune in today with new hosts, Jeremy Bellman and Cody Delmendo, as they discuss the Phoenix Member Education Program with the Coordinator of Educational Programs, Eric Eidson. Two undergraduates from the University of Nebraska and Harvard University also join the conversation to provide examples of how they have implemented or plan to implement the education into their chapters.

Every chapter or colony is looking for creative ways to engage and educate its members. The Phoenix Member Education Program provides a step-by-step process for engaging and educating all members of your chapter/colony whether you’re meeting in person or online. In this episode, Eric dives into the opportunities, activities, and accolades available in the new 2021 edition of The Phoenix Member Education Manual with Cody and Jeremy.
Listeners can learn how to implement these program updates in their own chapter or colony and hear from their fellow brothers, Garrett Rolph (Eminent Archon at Harvard University – Massachusetts Gamma) and Nolan Rinn (Member Educator at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln – Nebraska Lambda-Pi). Brother Rolph and Brother Rinn share and reflect upon their chapters’ experiences implementing The Phoenix Member Education Program and ask key questions regarding the new 2021 updates.
Watch Episode 1 of Season 2 on YouTube or listen on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The first episode of season two features SAE alumnus Stephen Simon.

Tune in today for an honest conversation with the future owner of the Indiana Pacers on mistakes made, lessons learned, and keys to success (aka everything you won’t learn in school). Foundation CEO, Steve Mitchell, interviewed Stephen over Zoom, and the two of them re-lived fond memories of their time at Indiana University. This episode is jam-packed with advice, wisdom, and of course, great stories.

Stephen is the son of Herbert Simon, Founder of Simon Property Group and owner of the Indiana Pacers.

Ever been to a mall? As the largest mall owner in the US, it’s likely owned by Simon Property Group.

Although he admits that he didn’t have much direction as a young adult, Stephen is successful in his own right as the Founder and Managing Partner of Simon Equity Partners, a private equity firm based in California. In addition to SEP, Stephen is a director for the Herbert Simon Family Foundation and on the board of directors for the Pacer’s Basketball Corporation, a team he will eventually inherit from his father. Stephen also serves on the boards of Central Indiana Land Trust, Conscious Alliance, and HeadCount.

Stephen speaks to some of the common themes that we’ve seen throughout Foundation episodes; be curious, never stop learning, and do what you love. He also discusses what he attributes his success to, from owning and learning from mistakes, and things he would change if he could go back in time. We also couldn’t let him go without talking Pacer’s basketball!

Watch Episode 1 of Season 2 on YouTube or listen on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The ninth episode of TG Talk features songwriter, entrepreneur, and SAE alumnus, Jimmy Dunne (Kentucky ’77). Let’s get real. What you think post-graduation life will be like may not be a reality. Don’t worry; we enlisted Jimmy to tell us the truth about what really happens after graduation. Have you ever scaled a wall to get an interview? We don’t recommend it, but Jimmy has.

Although considered by many to be a renaissance man, Jimmy is, first and foremost, a musician. He has studio albums and successful covers recorded by big names such as Whitney Houston, Janet Jackson, and Kenny Rogers. Jimmy’s songs have been recorded on 28 million records, in addition to scores, songs, and themes featured in over 1500 television episodes and dozens of films. Additionally, he is the Founder and CEO of Inspire. Inspire assists colleges and universities in composing and recording official university music and incorporating music into its overall culture.

Jimmy also has experience as a television writer and producer, working on hit shows such as Happy Days and Joanie Loves Chachi. Foundation CEO Steve Mitchell interviewed Jimmy about his extraordinary career and how he got his start. Jimmy gets real about what you need to do to succeed after college. While we don’t recommend using your musical talents to get out of paying the bill at a restaurant or scaling the fences at Paramount Pictures to get a job, we do think that Jimmy has a ton of great advice for undergraduates and young alumni who are starting in their careers.

Watch Episode 9 on YouTube or listen on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The eighth episode of TG Talk features Eminent Supreme Recorder, Chris Hancock (Indiana State ’96). Chris speaks about officer transitions, what current officers can do to prepare for them, and planning for the spring term. Additionally, we discuss adjusting goals to be COVID compliant and available resources to consider.

Listen to Episode 8 on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The seventh episode of TG Talk features Alex Sacopulos, a member from Indiana Delta who serves on the diversity, equity, and inclusion committees for his chapter and DePauw University, and Dustin Stewart, Manager of Chapter Development for SAE. Alex and Dustin discuss diversity, equity, and inclusion within a chapter and how members can begin conversations and support a diverse chapter experience on their campus.

Listen to Episode 7 on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The sixth episode of TG Talk features Robert Huffman, Development Manager for the Movember Foundation, and Anna Gath, Manager of Recurring Giving for The SAE Foundation. Robert shares the work of Movember which includes mental health and men’s health awareness. Additionally, he gives ideas about how chapters can get involved. Anna discusses SAE Foundation initiatives, engaging with your alumni network to build your chapter’s education fund, and what members can do to give back. To learn more about Movember, visit Movember.com, and for more on the SAE Foundation visit sae.net/foundation.

Listen to Episode 6 on SpotifyApple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The fifth episode of TG Talk features John Sebalos, Chair of the Council of Province Archons and Ryan Gibbons, Manager of Alumni Development. John and Ryan share strategies for engaging with alumni, building connections within a virtual setting, the benefits of strong alumni support, and ways for alumni to reconnect with the Fraternity.

Listen to Episode 5 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The fourth episode of TG Talk features SAE Foundation Trustee, Tom LaMantia. Did you know that interviewing is just like camping? No? Well, according to Tom, it is.

Tom is an entrepreneur with over 30 years of experience in digital transformation, which means he uses the newest and best technology to improve his client’s processes and customer relations. In addition to that, Tom advises senior-level management across many industries, guiding a variety of areas, including strategy, operations, marketing, and finance. He is also a professor for Northwestern University’s Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and Co-Founder and Managing Director of Magenium Solutions, a successful Microsoft service provider.

Tom has started several businesses throughout his career and thus has learned many difficult lessons along the way. Foundation CEO, Steve Mitchell interviewed Tom earlier this month on various topics, including advice on strategically prepping for and giving an interview (outrunning the other campers). However, despite its name, this episode explores so much more than career advice. Tune in for a discussion on striving to live up to the True Gentleman every day, setting personal and professional goals for ourselves, and crafting the perfect apology.

Watch Episode 4 on YouTube or listen to Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The third episode of TG Talk features Grant Maris, Manager of Chapter Expansion, and Kevin Gath, Coordinator of Chapter Development. Grant and Kevin share tips and tricks for virtual and hybrid recruitment, engaging with members in a virtual setting, re-engaging alumni members, the importance of checking in with your brothers during this difficult time, and resources that are available from the national office and our partners.

Listen to Episode 3 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The second episode of TG Talk features Justin Tinkler from Kansas State University, winner of the 2019-2020 John O. Moseley Award for Fraternity Zeal. Justin advises about recruiting the best members, setting goals as a chapter, and adapting chapter goals, operations, and recruitment tactics this fall.

Listen to Episode 2 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The first episode of TG Talk features Ross Pometta, Manager of Membership & Records, and Kaden Mortenson, Eminent Treasurer from Nevada Beta. Ross and Kaden give advice on financial planning for the fall including information on the fall invoice, navigating difficult conversations with chapter brothers, and utilizing OmegaFi to streamline your membership and financial records.

Listen to Episode 1 on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Anchor.

The Supreme Council is pleased to announce Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity’s 15th Eminent Supreme Recorder and Chief Executive Officer: Christopher W. Hancock (Indiana State ’96). His appointment begins on July 1, 2020.

Hancock first joined the Fraternity Service Center staff in 1996 as an Education and Leadership Consultant. He was subsequently promoted to Manager of Field Operations, then to Director of Educational Programs & Services, then Assistant Executive Director – Region III. He also served the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation as Regional Campaign Director and, most recently, Senior Director of Operations and Alumni Development for the SAE Financial & Housing Corporation.

A dedicated volunteer, Hancock served on the Advisory Board, House Corporation, and Alumni Association of Indiana Sigma. On the national level, he led as Province Psi Archon, Director of the John O. Moseley Leadership School, and as Chairman for the Leadership School Planning, Member Education, and Alumni Services committees. Sigma Alpha Epsilon has awarded Hancock with the Order of the Lion, Order of Minerva, and Merit Key Award for his longtime and continual dedication to the organization. He is a Silver Level donor of the SAE Foundation.

“The Supreme Council is fortunate to have someone with Chris’s experience to lead the Fraternity during these uncertain times,” said Eminent Supreme Archon Greg Brandt. “He shares our vision of growth and has the skill set to effectively implement SAE’s strategic plan. We are honored that Chris has stepped up to the challenges and opportunities of being Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s next Eminent Supreme Recorder.”

“I am incredibly honored and humbled to serve as the next Eminent Supreme Recorder & CEO,” said Hancock. “We are in unique and unprecedented times, but change brings opportunities for dialogue, introspection, and a recommitment to our mission and vision. I look forward to working with our professional staff to serve the Realm as we seek to make our global community better.”

Hancock also has significant experience in non-profit and higher education sectors outside of SAE: Executive Director of Triangle National Fraternity, Executive Director of Career Development and Executive Director of Alumni Engagement at Ivy Tech Community College, Executive Director of the Indiana State University Alumni Association, Executive Director of Bicycle Indiana, and President of Race Inc. Bicycles.

During his undergraduate tenure, Hancock served in numerous leadership roles, including Recruitment Chairman and Eminent Archon. He graduated from Indiana State University with a Bachelor of Science in sociology, a Master of Science in Student Affairs & Higher Education Administration, and is a doctoral student in Adult and Community Educational at Ball State University. Hancock and his wife Dana (Alpha Chi Omega) have a son Tyler, a junior in high school.

This content was provided by Movember, a proud educational partner of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

MOUSTACHE SEASON ARRIVES AS MOVEMBER KICKS-OFF ANNUAL FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN

  • Everyone can sign-up to Grow, Move or Host to raise funds and awareness for men’s health
  • Money raised during Movember funds programs and research in the areas of prostate cancer, testicular cancer and mental health and suicide prevention
  • In the US, men die on average six years earlier than women

This November, Americans will see more moustaches walking the streets as Movember kicks-off its 12th annual campaign across the United States, returning with its month-long fundraiser challenging men and women to sign up on Movember.com and Grow, Move or Host to help raise funds and awareness for men’s health. To date, through moustaches grown and conversations generated, Movember has proudly welcomed nearly six million supporters and helped fund over 1,250 innovative men’s health projects across twenty countries.

In the US, the stats around men’s health are shocking. Each year, more than 174,500 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer. More than 3 million men are living with the disease. Globally, every minute, a man dies by suicide. In the United States, 3 out of 4 suicides are men. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men, and although in most cases the outcome for men with the disease is positive, a 95% chance of survival is of no comfort to the one in twenty who won’t make it. Funds raised during Movember (and all year round) go towards funding innovative global programs and research aimed at these primary cause areas, with the intent of tackling these stats head-on and reducing the number of men dying prematurely by 25% by 2030.

Everyone planning to join the movement should sign up at www.movember.com.

  • GROW: A moustache. On Movember 1st, men are encouraged to shave their faces clean and grow just a moustache for the month. Wear it proudly – your Mo is the easiest way to start a conversation about men’s health.
  • MOVE: You don’t need to be an athlete to sign-up to Move. Fundraisers can run or walk 60 miles over the month – that’s 60 miles for the 60 men lost to suicide each hour, around the world that’s a man every minute.
  • HOST: For party-planners, Host encourages Mo Bros and Mo Sisters to organize an event – from a trivia night, to a potluck, or happy hour at work. Events help gather your Mo community together and raise funds for men’s health.

Movember is committed to changing the face of men’s health and is active year-round promoting positive programs for men. The charity recognizes globally, men are dying six years earlier than women due to preventable or treatable health issues such as prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide. Movember is committed to ensuring women and men worldwide can have as much time as possible with their dads, brothers, uncles, partners and friends.

Over the summer of 2019, Beyond Adventures offered Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s undergraduate and alumni members, including family members, an opportunity to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. Consistent with SAE’s vision of True Gentleman making our global community better, participants volunteered at a local school in a remote Tanzanian village before the climb. It was a once-in-a-lifetime adventure to leave the familiar and embrace life outside the comfort zone, all in the company of fellow SAE brothers.


INTERESTED IN CLIMBING MOUNT KILIMANJARO WITH SAE BROTHERS JULY 1-13, 2020? COMPLETE THE INTEREST FORM!


Summiting Mount Kilimanjaro has been on the bucket list for Steve Johnson (Tennessee-Martin ’76) for several years. A casual climber, the former cop has been hiking 14,000+ foot mountains since 2001 and replied to the very first email inquiry. “I may not have the opportunity to do it again as I get older,” he said. “Summitting a mountain is an intense journey, something you cannot share, except with those who have been. The summits may be different, but the feelings you experience at the top are the same every single time.”

 

Keith Wosneski (Denver ’94) also took an interest in the trip for his bucket list. During his junior year, he studied abroad, and since then, Africa has always been on the list of destinations. With zero climbing experience, ascending Africa’s highest peak seemed a bit daunting for the father of three. However, it was his ties to SAE that ultimately made his decision. “My old roommate and former Eminent Archon of my chapter passed away last year unexpectedly. I saw the email about the trip immediately after and knew I had to go and take my son Kole,” said Wosneski. “I travel a lot for work and know that time is precious, especially with family. It was an opportunity to cross Africa off my list, spend quality time with my family, and expose my children to other cultures. How could I say no?”

 

Unlike his seniors, Brian Meyer (William & Mary ’17) discovered the trip in a slightly different fashion. Although he was aware of the opportunity, the recent graduate had another major priority in his life: finding a job. Traveling to another country was not a consideration. One phone call from a Supreme Council member made the difference. “Mike Rodgers (William & Mary ’92) called me personally to inquire about my interest,” Meyer recounts. “While he may serve the entire Realm, Mike always makes sure that his chapter stays involved. It reminds us that it doesn’t matter how big or small the school or chapter is — anyone can make a difference.”

 

The youngest member on the trip, Johnny Vrba, is still an undergraduate at Arizona State University. The self-proclaimed adrenaline enthusiast was all-in, immediately. Having already mastered the water (SCUBA certified and lifeguard), he wanted to take on the Earth. “I’m so comfortable in the water, and never realized how little of ‘the outdoors’ I have experienced. My first time sleeping in a tent was at the base of Kilimanjaro,” reflected Vrba.

 

Although the men knew each other by name and Fraternity, none of them would meet until the first day of the trip. The travel obstacles they faced while traveling globally (long flights, crying babies, long customs lines, and airplane food) faded into the distance during the drive from the airport to the hotel. “It was truly unique to see because the mountain range covers so many geographical areas. You can see the jungles, mountains, and clouds all at once,” remembers Wosneski.

After a much-needed night of rest, the group continued to Legho Village, their pseudo-home base for the next two days, and the location of the service project. “The village, located in the mountains, has stunning views of the surrounding around including Mount Kilimanjaro,” said Meyer. Views aside, one of the focuses of the trip was philanthropy. Poverty is one of the most significant issues worldwide, and seeing a shanty town first-hand puts it into perspective. “Just by being born in the United States, you’ve hit the jackpot,” claims Wosneski. “It brings all the things you see on TV or read about to life.”  

The night finished around a campfire to reflect on the day and set expectations for the following day. The SAEs often stayed up late, conversing on Fraternity and life. These gatherings became regular nightly “meetings,” with the SAEs jokingly declaring themselves founding fathers of the Mount Kilimanjaro chapter. When discussing the trip, all four brothers proclaimed they are closer to each other than their chapter brothers. “We quickly connected over the common purpose of the mountain, but the diversity of life experiences between the four of us truly solidified our bonds,” recalls Johnson. Vrba, the sole undergraduate on the trip, said getting to know Wosneski and Johnson was one the highlights of the trip. “Until then, my interactions were mainly with members of my age. I got to see a whole different side of SAE and life. I probably also know more about Keith [Wosneski] and Steve [Johnson] than their wives do.”

 

Philanthropy was a focus on this adventure — the SAEs brought sports equipment and school supplies to an elementary school in the village. They also painted the classrooms and played games: soccer, football, frisbee, duck-duck-goose, sing-alongs, races, and dance-offs, to name a few. Activities aside, Wosneski said the impact the group had on the kids and vice-versa was the best part of the day. “To see the village kids light up from the gifts was one thing. To see a change in world perspective, to show us how good we have it, that made the trip,” he reflected. “My son, Kole, connected with one of the porters (guides) who was climbing the mountain over and over with other people’s stuff on his back, to pay his college tuition. Kole realized very quickly how truly blessed we are.”

With the service project completed, there was only one task left: climb Mount Kilimanjaro. Every day was a grind, physically and mentally. Wake up, eat breakfast, climb, eat lunch, climb, eat dinner, sleep. Wash, rinse, and repeat, six times over. Once the physical exhaustion sets in, which it will no matter how much you train, the mental determination takes over. “There’s a sense of perseverance that drives you forward. I don’t know how to explain it, but just being there, on the mountainside, seeing the peak, really makes you push yourself in ways I didn’t know was possible,” recalls Meyer. “Having other brothers there also helped. We motivated each other, and we kept each other in check. But most importantly, we looked out for one another.”

On the third day of the ascent, Johnson was suffering from severe altitude sickness. According to the porters (guides), this day was the most important for adjusting to new altitudes as the group broke the cloud line at 10,000 feet. If you didn’t acclimate today, it would be impossible to continue higher. Johnson, already falling behind in pace, was advised not to push forth. Going up is not a good idea with altitude sickness. Aside from the obvious health concerns, Johnson said, “I’m not saying this to be noble. I honestly didn’t want something to happen to ruin a possible future trip.” With the rights and feelings of others rather than his own in mind, Steve Johnson started his descent down Mount Kilimanjaro.

After loading his daypack with oxygen packs (just in case), Johnson and one of the porters, Samia, said their farewells and began hiking down. To save time, they took a more direct route but at the expense of a much steeper incline. At one point, there was an 8ft wide, narrow ledge they had to traverse over while clinging to the mountainside. Looking down was not advised. Upon arriving at a flatter region, they ran into another porter from a different company. He had gotten sick (like Johnson) and was sent home, but the company didn’t provide him with transportation or money to get there. Johnson kindly offered to share his ride whenever it arrived. However, the other porter’s destination was two hours in the opposite direction of Beyond Adventure’s home base. “I asked what it would take to get this fellow home… $3.00. I was flabbergasted! All this hullabaloo over three measly dollars, a cup of coffee at Starbucks. I was amazed that such a small sum in the USA could have such a huge impact in Tanzania.”

Johnson gave three dollars to Samia, to give to the other porter. He explained that the other porter needed to recognize Samia as the person who helped him out — it would help build relationships later. “I’m retelling this story not to be braggadocios. I’m retelling the story, so people reading this will understand the absolute desperation and poverty we have witnessed in Tanzania. How a people living under such depressed and depressing conditions could be so happy & kind and so quick to smile & laugh and have the sweetest spirit. We should be ashamed in the USA for how much we take for granted,” reflected Johnson.

 

Dedicating the rest of the climb to Brother Johnson, the remaining SAEs pushed forward. The night before, the climbers turned in after an early dinner to wake up around midnight to begin the summit attempt, an 11-16 hour day. Temperatures usually range from -4° to 5° Fahrenheit, but luckily the thermometers read a balmy 30 on departure. After hours of hiking in the dark, the sun started to rise about 45 minutes from summitting. Most were out of breath and beginning to feel the effects of climbing for seven days straight. “Nevertheless, we persevered past the pain and kept our eyes, physically and mentally, on the goal: the tallest point in Africa,” recounts Meyer. Around 7 am, the group arrived at Uhuru Peak, the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro and the highest point in Africa (19,344 feet).


“One of the most physically, mentally, and spiritually challenging things I’ve ever accomplished.” -Keith Wosneski

 

“No words can describe the emotions I felt up there.” -Brian Meyer

 

“Best time of my life, honestly. It’s going to be hard topping this.” -Johnny Vrba

 

“Climbing Kilimanjaro, even only as far as I got, was life-changing. Extremely humbling meeting people from other parts of the world.” -Steve Johnson
After 20 minutes on the peak, the cold and tired band of brothers were encouraged to start the climb down. Like Johnson before them, they took a different, more direct route. The six-day ascent only takes a day-and-a-half to descend. They traversed down loose sand and dirt, unlike the hard rocks they encountered going up. “It was difficult not because of the terrain, but because we were incredibly tired and our legs already felt like noodles,” said Meyer. Tired, but not broken, the trip closed with a final dinner. Johnson greeted the group at base camp, eagerly awaiting their return. The group went around, reflecting on the profound insights they had discovered over the nearly two-week excursion. It was clear that everyone was taking something intangible from the climb.

 

“I learned more about myself and the world during this trip than sitting inside any classroom could have ever taught me. Laughter truly is a universal language. Out of fear comes the greatest reward. The gift of life should not be taken for granted. This trip was the start of something huge.” -Johnny Vrba

 

“Being willing to take on a new challenge is the biggest challenge. This trip has certainly given me a new perspective on life.” – Keith Wosneski

 

“Physically speaking, climbing the mountain was only part of the journey. Having the mental and emotional strength was just as important, if not more.” -Brian Meyer

 

“Most people my age ponder life’s irony and count their blessings at this stage. I’m amazed that I can still go through life-changing experiences. Will the humility that I experienced stayed with me for life?” -Steve Johnson

 

Each gentleman on this trip left part of himself on the mountain, but also took part of it home. The lessons learned about the world and self will forever resonate with our members who stood among the clouds. These brothers share a deeper bond of brotherhood that only they will truly understand. All four were extremely adamant that the wide-range of ages and life stages of the brothers was the best SAE-related thing about the trip.

 

“We share a common understanding of what it means to be a True Gentleman, and now, a wealth of life experiences. Did we always see eye-to-eye? Of course not. Did we come from the same backgrounds? Not even close. However, our brotherly bond transcended those differences. It made this trip an enjoyable one in the company of my fraternity brothers.” -Brian Meyer

In December 2018, Sigma Alpha Epsilon joined several other interfraternal partners in filing a lawsuit against Harvard University in federal court, challenging their overreaching policy which sanctions individual students for choosing to join unrecognized single-sex organizations. In early 2019, Harvard responded by filing a motion to dismiss the case.

Friday evening, we learned that the Federal district judge assigned to the case had denied Harvard’s motion to dismiss – rejecting it almost entirely. The federal judge’s verdict reaffirms the validity of our Title IX claims. The following statement was released to the media on behalf of the Stand Up to Harvard Coalition Friday evening:

Today’s decision rightly recognizes that the lawsuit states four viable legal claims that Harvard’s Sanctions Policy discriminates on the basis of sex,” said R. Stanton Jones of Arnold & Porter, a lawyer for the plaintiffs in the federal case. “The court acknowledged what is undeniably true: Harvard’s Policy is discriminatory twice-over. As the court said, the Policy ‘discriminates both on the basis of the sex of the students in the social organization and the sex of the student who associates with that organization.’ The time has come for Harvard to end this discriminatory policy and do the right thing. Harvard should stop discriminating against its students and trust them to make their own choices about who to associate with.”

A PDF of the ruling is available to download. We will provide additional information as it develops.

This is a critical case in our right to maintain single-sex status as an organization. We celebrate this important victory.  We are proud of our men at Harvard and all SAE Brothers from around the country that have joined in this fight. While this is only the first of many battles ahead, we celebrate with gratitude your support.

Dustin Stewart (Georgia Southern University – Armstrong ’17) has been promoted to Manager of Chapter Development. Stewart previously served as a Coordinator of Chapter Development. In his role, Stewart will manage Central district field staff, coordinate health-and-safety programs and initiatives, and support volunteers and university partners. As an undergraduate, Stewart served as Eminent Archon, Eminent Treasurer, and Philanthropy and Service Chairman. Prior to his employment at SAE, Stewart served as an intern in the office of the governor of Georgia.

 

Grant Maris (North Dakota State ’17) has been promoted to Coordinator of Recruitment. Maris previously served as a Coordinator of Chapter Development. In his new role, Maris will assist current chapters and colonies in the development of recruitment plans, provide in-person and digital recruitment training, and execute expansion projects. As an undergraduate, Maris served as his chapter’s Eminent Archon, Eminent Deputy Archon, Recruitment Chairman, and Philanthropy and Service Chairman. He graduated in December of 2017 with a BS in Marketing and a Professional Selling Certification.

 

Dave Pascarella (Indiana State University ‘17) has been hired as Visual Media Designer. Pascarella graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Fine Arts with a concentration in Graphic Design. As an undergraduate, Pascarella served his chapter as Eminent Recorder, New Member Educator, and Philanthropy and Service Chairman. He has also attended the John. O. Moseley School in 2016.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon prides itself on being one of the nation’s oldest and largest fraternities – a distinction that brings with it centuries of dedicated members. Though size and age create a sense stability and experience, they alone do not dictate the quality of an organization, which is why our brotherhood has also continued to be a pioneer of change, always remaining at the forefront of innovation and advancement among the ever-changing cultural landscape of today’s Universities.

This tenured history makes it all the more impressive for an individual or a single chapter to receive any honor that distinguishes them from the greater fraternal body. We would like to congratulate all of the following award recipients on their well-deserved recognition and their continued commitment to rising above:

Outstanding Alumni Relations

Winner:

University of Evansville
(Indiana Epsilon)

Runners Up:

North Dakota State University
(North Dakota Beta)

University of Cincinnati
(Ohio Epsilon)


Outstanding Chapter Scholarship

Winner:

Simpson College
(Iowa Sigma)

Runners Up:

Nicholls State University
(Louisiana Chi)

Kansas State University
(Kansas Beta)


Outstanding Eminent Archon

Winners:

Andrew Steelman
The Ohio State University
(Ohio Theta)

Angel Reyes Valtierra
New Mexico State University
(New Mexico Phi)

Anthony Pantano
University of Dayton
(Ohio Chi-Sigma)

Cameron Gunter
Baylor University
(Texas Theta)

Chad Thomas Blank
North Dakota State University
(North Dakota Beta)

Jake Harris
University of Central Oklahoma
(Oklahoma Sigma)

Jonathan Ross
Franklin College
(Indiana Alpha)

Zachary Watson
Texas State University
(Texas Sigma)


Outstanding Eminent Treasurer

Winners:

Evan Hosinski
University of Dayton
(Ohio Chi-Sigma)

Dakota Chappell
Texas State University
(Texas Sigma)

Ross Fabrizi
Youngstown State University
(Ohio Alpha)

William Cocking
Kansas State University
(Kansas Beta)


Outstanding Health-and-Safety

Winner:

University of Evansville
(Indiana Epsilon)

Runner Up:

South Dakota State University
(South Dakota Theta)


Outstanding Housing

Winner:

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
(New York Epsilon)

Runner Up:

University of Evansville
(Indiana Epsilon)


Outstanding University Relations

Winner:

University of Evansville
(Indiana Epsilon)

Runner Up:

University of Puget Sound
(Washington Gamma)


Brandon Weghorst Outstanding Chapter Communication

Winner:

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University – Prescott
(Arizona Delta)

Runner Up:

North Dakota State University
(North Dakota Beta)


Smith-Huffman Outstanding Chapter Management

Winner:

Centre College
(Kentucky Kappa)

Runner Up:

Worcester Polytechnic Institute
(Massachusetts Delta)

Simpson College
(Iowa Sigma)


Kimball-Phelps Award for Outstanding Chapter Singing

Winner:

North Dakota State University
(North Dakota Beta)


Besser-Lindsey Outstanding Scholar Athlete

Winner:

Barrett T. Weiss
Stanford University
(California Alpha)


M. Todd Buchanan Oustanding Recruitment Chairman

Winner:

Brandon Elyakim
Lynn University
(Florida Lambda)


Outstanding Chapter Member Education

Winner:

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
(Pennsylvania Kappa)

Runner Up:

Worcester Polytechnic Institute
(Massachuetts Delta)


Outstanding Financial Management

Winner:

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
(New York Epsilon)

Runners Up:

University of Cincinnati
(Ohio Epsilon)

University of Toledo
(Ohio Nu)


Joseph A. Mancini Outstanding Chapter Service and Philanthropy

Winner:

University of Rhode Island
(Rhode Island Alpha)

Runner Up:

Nicholls State University
(Louisiana Chi)


Robert C. Cousins Outstanding Chapter Recruitment

Winner:

Kansas State University
(Kansas Beta)

Runner Up:

Morehead State University
(Kansas Gamma)


Harry S. Bunting Outstanding Colony of the Year

Winner:

Arizona State University
(Arizona Beta)

Runner Up:

Baylor University
(Texas Theta)


Outstanding Chapter Advisors

Winners:

Beau Bateman
North Dakota State University
(North Dakota Beta)

David Pfalzgraf
Miami University
(Ohio Tau)

Jason Andrick
Frostburg State University
(Maryland Delta)

Jesse McHugh
Morehead State University
(Kentucky Gamma)

John Brkic
Youngstown State University
(Ohio Alpha)

John R. Hatfield
Kansas State University
(Kansas Beta)

Rebecca Bair
University of Toledo
(Ohio Nu)


Bill Fiscus Outstanding Area Alumni Association

Winner:

SAE – Phoenix Alumni, Inc.

Runner Up:

San Diego Alumni Association


Outstanding Alumni Association & House Corporation Communication

Printed Newsletters – Winner:

South Carolina Delta Alumni Association

Website – Winner:

San Diego Alumni Association


Outstanding Chapter Alumni Association

Winner:

Missouri Gamma Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon AA

Runner Up:

Ohio Alpha Alumni Association


Outstanding House Corporation

Winner:

Oregon Alpha House Corporation

Runner Up:

Ohio Alpha Housing Corporation


Outstanding Alumni Association Special Events or Project

Winner:

San Diego Alumni Association

Runner Up:

Ohio Alpha Alumni Association


Stuart Zoock Outstanding Advisory Board

Winner:

Oregon Alpha Alumni Association


Bradley M. Cohen Eminent Archon of the Year

Winner:

Jake Harris
University of Central Oklahoma
(Oklahoma Sigma)


Chapter Achievement

Winners:

Bucknell University
(Pennsylvania Zeta)

California State University-San Marcos
(California Alpha-Gamma)

Carnegie Mellon University
(Pennsylvania Phi)

Centre College
(Kentucky Kappa)

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Prescott
(Arizona Delta)

Georgia Institute of Technology
(Georgia Phi)

Gustavus Adolphus College
(Minnesota Gamma)

Kansas State University
(Kansas Beta)

Mississippi State University
(Mississippi Theta)

Nicholls State University
(Louisiana Chi)

North Dakota State University
(North Dakota Beta)

Oregon State University
(Oregon Alpha)

Rollins College
(Florida Omicron)

Salisbury University
(Maryland Sigma)

Simpson College
(Iowa Sigma)

South Dakota State University
(South Dakota Theta)

Texas State University-San Marcos
(Texas Sigma)

Towson University
(Maryland Alpha)

University of Dayton
(Ohio Chi-Sigma)

University of Evansville
(Indiana Epsilon)

University of Puget Sound
(Washington Gamma)

University of Toledo
(Ohio Nu)

Youngstown State University
(Ohio Alpha)


Most Improved Chapter

Winner:

Rollins College
(Florida Omicron)

Runner Up:

Texas State University – San Marcos
(Texas Sigma)


True Gentleman of the Year

Winner:

Zachary Watson
(Texas Sigma)


John O. Moseley Award for Fraternity Zeal

Winner:

University of Evansville
(Indiana Epsilon)

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Foundation Board of Trustees and the members of our Scholarship
Selection Committee proudly announce our 2018-2019 academic year scholarship recipients. These brothers excel in their personal, professional and academic pursuits, and their accomplishments have earned the recognition among their peers. This year, the Foundation awarded 44 scholarships totaling $81,000.

We thank our generous supporters, both alumni and friends, who make these scholarships possible. In addition, we encourage you to congratulate any winners you may know. The name of the scholarship, followed by the scholarship’s category or area of interest, and its respective recipients are listed below.

The 2020 Scholarships open on November 1st. For more information, and to apply, visit sae.net/resources/scholarships

G. Robert Hamrdla Award (History)
Nolan Dee (Wofford) – $2,000
Past Eminent Supreme Recorder Bob Hamrdla (Stanford ’60) established this award for a brother in any major with transcripts that reflect considerable study of 19th and 20th century history.
Jones-Laurence Award (Academic Performance)
Nathan Holloway (Michigan State) – $2,000
Ryan Axtell (Washington State) – $2,000

Established in memory of past Eminent Supreme Archon Walter B. Jones (Auburn ’10) and Philip J. Laurence (Minnesota ’15), the award is given to the brothers who display the most outstanding academic achievement.
Dr. Charles A. Preuss Medical Award (Medical)
Kumar Amarnath (DePauw) – $2,000
Frederick Kudlata (Vanderbilt) – $2,000

Established in memory of Brother Dr. Charles A. Preuss (Idaho ’24), this award recognizes brothers attending or planning to attend medical school, or enrolled in a course of study related to medicine and who have demonstrated service to their community and fellow man.
Frank C. Ginocchio Professional Staff Leadership Scholarship (Health & Safety)
Travis Tafoya (UC – Colorado Springs) – $3,000
Established in recognition of Brother Frank C. Ginocchio’s (Northwestern ’66) leadership while serving on the Sigma Alpha Epsilon staff, this scholarship recognizes brothers who have demonstrated a positive influence in the field of risk management.
Thomas W. Devine Volunteer Leadership Scholarship (Health & Safety)
Davis Popplewell (Union) – $3,000
Established in recognition of Brother Thomas W. Devine’s (Minnesota ’74) volunteer efforts on behalf of Sigma Alpha Epsilon, this scholarship recognizes brothers who have demonstrated a positive influence in the field of risk management.
W. Emil Forman Award (Community Service)
Logan Held (South Dakota State) – $3,000
Jacob Labonte (Mount Union) – $3,000
Alex Grove (Centre) – $2,000
Oscar Ambrocio-Ramirez (Stanford) – $2,000
Tyler Wiles (Cal State – San Marcos) – $2,000
Logan Wolschlager (Kettering) – $1,000
Nicholas Witcher (Kentucky) – $1,000
Shane Januik (New Jersey) – $1,000
Ross Fabrizi (Youngstown) – $1,000
Christopher Carras (Rowan) – $1,000

Established in memory of Brother W. Emil Forman (Pennsylvania ’29), this award recognizes brothers who have shown extraordinary commitment to their community and fellow man as demonstrated by community service work.
Bradley M. Cohen Courage Award (Courage)
Austin Ciuffo (Wofford) – $1,000
Past Eminent Supreme Archon Bradley M. Cohen (Arizona ’85) established this award to recognize brothers who have shown extraordinary courage in overcoming a major personal or organizational obstacle.
Ivan Allen Jr. Leadership Award
Andrew Peck (William & Mary) – $1,000
Chabier Coleman (Georgia Southern – Armstrong) – $1,000

Established in memory of Brother Ivan Allen Jr. (Georgia Tech ’33), this award was created by Atlanta-area brothers. The award is given to the brother whose leadership in the chapter and community demonstrates the spirit of Allen, a former Atlanta mayor.
Fred Archibald Leadership Award
Andrew Thorson (North Dakota State) – $2,000
Joe Rogan (Washington – Missouri) -$2,000

Established in memory of Brothers Fred J. Archibald (Cornell ’45) and his father, Fred I. Archibald (Nebraska ’14), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in their chapter, community and school.
Charles Collins Award
Dustin Stewart (Georgia Southern – Armstrong) – $3,000
Brandon Beck (Millsaps) – $3,000
Nolan Duda (Adrian) – $3,000
Carter Atchison (Wofford) – $2,000
Mark Martin (Arizona State) – $2,000
Ryan Funai (California – Riverside) – $2,000
Waco Bays (Morehead State) – $2,000
Noah Burns (Texas A&M) – $1,000
Connor Roberts (Western Kentucky) – $1,000
Matthew Erdner (College of Charleston) – $1,000
Tyler Hungate (Simpson) – $1,000
Kyle Michel (South Carolina) – $1,000
Roy Requena (La Verne) – $1,000
Garrett Starks (Baylor) – $1,000

Established in memory of Brother Charles F. Collins (Boston ’12), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and service in the Fraternity, on the campus and in the community.
Richard Generelly Leadership Award
Thomas Jenson (Arizona State) – $2,000
Andrew Skidmore (Fresno State) – $2,000

Established in memory of past ESA Richard Generelly (George Washington ’47), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in their chapter, community and school.
Joseph Mancini Leadership Award
Thomas Astarita (New Jersey) – $2,000
Established in memory of past ESA Joseph Mancini (Cincinnati ’35), this award recognizes brothers who have demonstrated outstanding leadership in their chapter, community and school.
Warren P. Poslusny Award 
Tyler Finkenthal (Mount Union) – $3,000
Justin Venckus (San Diego State) – $2,000
Matthew Martinez (Embry Riddle) – $2,000
Luke Hoard (Morehead State) – $2,000

Past Honorary Eminent Supreme Archon and former Foundation Trustee Warren Paul “Pos” Poslusny (Kettering ’69) established this award to recognize brothers who have demonstrated an enthusiastic commitment to the highest ideals expressed in “The True Gentleman” including exceptional personal integrity while leading chapter and campus activities, coupled with notable philanthropic service and scholastic achievement.
Trustees Award for Scholarship and Service 
Bryon Moradshahi (Arizona State) – $2,000
Funded by Foundation Trustees, this award recognizes brothers who demonstrate quality involvement in campus and chapter leadership positions, particularly the measure of his contribution to the education of his chapter brothers.

The most recent John O. Moseley Award for Fraternity Zeal winning chapter continues to build on its young, rich history. The chapter at California State University—San Marcos (Alpha-Gamma) was bequeathed the award in 2018. Founded in 1999, it is one of the younger chapters in the Realm, but that hasn’t stopped them from striving for, and already achieving, greatness.

“This chapter is full of driven, hard-working and passionate young men who care so deeply about this chapter, their brothers and what it is they do every day, including philanthropy but also just this campus,” said former Eminent Archon Alexander Zarrabian.

As part of its winning portfolio, the chapter raised more than $20,000 for the Law Enforcement Memorial housed at Levere Memorial Temple. The memorial dedicated in memory of the men of Sigma Alpha Epsilon who gave their lives at the World Trade Center and The Pentagon on September 11, 2001, in combat operations since 2001, and in the line of duty protecting communities and enforcing law. This year, the chapter hosted a home-run derby which raised an additional $17,000 for the memorial.

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